Tradecorp International https://tradecorp.com.es/en Expert in micronutrients and speciality fertilise Wed, 12 Aug 2020 11:51:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 7 tips for a gold standard salinity and sodicity management program https://tradecorp.com.es/en/7-tips-for-a-gold-standard-salinity-and-sodicity-management-program/ Thu, 06 Aug 2020 10:35:26 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6865 Salinity and sodicity could be affecting your crops without you even knowing! Between 25 - 35% of worldwide agricultural lands are affected by these two abiotic stresses, which are also probably the two most difficult to manage. However, there are 7 tips that can help you counteract the negative effects of salinity and sodicity. Continue […]

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Salinity and sodicity could be affecting your crops without you even knowing! Between 25 - 35% of worldwide agricultural lands are affected by these two abiotic stresses, which are also probably the two most difficult to manage.

However, there are 7 tips that can help you counteract the negative effects of salinity and sodicity. Continue reading to learn how to develop this gold standard program!

salinity

1. Start with the soil

Often overlooked in salinity and sodicity management, early application to soil of Humic Acid products like Humifirst / Humistar or Turbo Root should be one of the key foundations of any salinity and sodicity management program. Salinity and sodicity reduce root biomass, and with less roots the crop has less surface area to absorb water and nutrients.

Humic Acids increase root growth and absorption selectivity while also helping improve Sodium tolerance.

Tradecorp’s research with Italian Research Centre, Landlab, has demonstrated the astonishing effect of Humistar / Humifirst on root growth rate and biomass as shown in this time-lapse video.

2. Counteract the Potassium uptake problem

Salinity and sodicity reduce Potassium uptake from the soil and this often creates Potassium – Sodium imbalances in the crop tissue. As the crop is already facing difficulties in absorbing sufficient water, and nutrients, from the salty soil solution regardless of the quantity of nutrients in the soil, applications of high quality foliar Potassium, such as Final K or Amifol K, bypass these problems and help ensure the crop is adequately nourished with Potassium.

3. Boost the energy of the crop

Crops have some ability to excrete excess salinity and sodicity both directly and indirectly… but this takes a lot of energy and can result in crop energy deficits that reduce growth and eventually yield.

The foliar application of Amino Acid products from the Delfan and Aton families help give crops a boost in energy which enables increased production of proteins related to abiotic stress management. This helps the crop maintain growth while also reducing the tendency to abort flowers and fruit as the crop tries to save energy, which as growers know, is a very common problem in saline and sodic soils.

4. Prevent the effects of abiotic stress with Primactive products

Biostimulants with a Primactive effect prepare or “prime” crops to increase their tolerance to abiotic stress. However, correct timing of biostimulant application is critical to ensure maximum effect. This is particularly important in the case of biostimulants with Primactive effect.

As salinity and sodicity are “permanent” stresses, there is no start or finish to the stress, making prevention or priming type application a bit different. Tradecorp recommends applying products with Primactive effect, such as Phylgreen, by fractionation, spray little and often to the crop, where cases of salinity and sodicity are suspected or known. In these situations the objective is to help reduce the abiotic stress effect across the entire crop cycle.

Fractionation type application will not only help the crop better resist abiotic stress along the cycle via the Primactive effect, but also provides key compounds such as mannitol. These natural compounds are called “compatible osmolytes” and help reduce the damage to plant cells and genetic structure that results from salinity and sodicity induced drought stress caused by decreased water absorption as mentioned above.

5. Reduce salinity and sodicity in the root zone

Active management of salinity and sodicity in the root zone can help increase profitability without incurring the cost of treating the whole soil area. Solutions specifically designed to tackle the saline root zone, Saltrad for example, are effective solutions that enable farmers to continue profitable production.
Saltrad has been designed to tackle salinity and sodicity through multiple modes of action in the soil. For example, the Organic Acids contained in Saltrad preferentially lift Sodium from the soil surface resuspending it back into the soil solution - in effect washing the surface of the soil free from Sodium. The washed soil surface is then covered and protected with highly soluble Calcium that is present in Saltrad helping to restore the natural soil structure and this improves growers ability to wash or leach the Sodium down below the root zone by leaching irrigations or during heavy rainfall.

6. Leach soluble salts below the root zone

Did you know that 1 megalitre of water that is saline to 1ds /m (640 mg / kg or 640 ppm) contains 640 kg of salts and these will be deposited on the land during the irrigation?
Irrigation water, although key for crops, often brings the unwanted side effect of naturally dissolved salts, particularly Sodium and Chloides, and this is why salinity and salinity can appear quickly in soils under irrigation.

And did you know that in addition to salts, irrigation water usually contains dissolved bicarbonates and that these bicarbonates solubilise Calcium from the surface of soil particles?
These bicarbonates increase leaching of Calcium down below the root zone with the position in the soil previously occupied by the Calcium now replaced with the Sodium in the irrigation water.

These combined processes accelerate the build-up of salinity and sodicity!

With this in mind, the elimination of Bicarbonates from irrigation water, with products like Lower 7, is key to reducing Calcium leaching and helps to slow down the build-up of salinity and sodicity in soils.

7. Back to basics - don´t forget your micronutrients

When managing salinity and sodicity it is easy to forget the basics. In addition to reducing macronutrient uptake such as Potassium and Phosphorus, salinity and sodicity reduce the uptake of most micronutrients, making it very common for crops to suffer from the “hidden” hunger of micronutrient deficiency.

Soil tests will often show adequate reserves of micronutrients but under the stressful growing conditions of salinity and sodicity, micronutrient absorption is reduced, which increases the chance of sub-optimal yield and quality and thus reduced profitability.

Avoid the risk of hidden hunger using Tradecorp´s EDTA/EDDHA Chelates. EDTA / EDDHA chelates are recognised as the most effective micronutrient type for use in soils and help ensure sufficient uptake of the nutrient by plants and they are also ideal for foliar application due to their excellent tank-mixing properties.

The benefits of the 7 tips outlined above in salinity and sodicity management are cumulative, combing most, or all, will give maximum benefit and profitability.

Next article- Case study from client using Tradecorp´s Integrated Salinity and Sodicity Management Program

In the next article Tradecorp will present a case study from a client in Australia who has benefited from using Tradecorp´s Integrated Salinity and Sodicity Management Program.

References:

1. Khaleda, L. P. (2017). Humic Acid Confers HIGH-AFFINITY K+ TRANSPORTER 1-Mediated Salinity Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis. Molecules and Cells, 40, 966-975.
doi: doi.org/10.14348%2Fmolcells.2017.0229

2. Merwad, A. (2017). Effect of humic and fulvic substances and Moringa leaf extract on Sudan grass plants grown under saline conditions. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 97, 703 - 716.
doi: doi.org/10.1139/cjss-2017-0050

3. DPI NSW. (2014). Farm water quality and treatment. Sydney: Department of Primary Industries, New South Wales State Government.

4. Gangloff, W. W. (2006). Relative availability coefficients of organic and inorganic Zn fertilizers. Journal of Plant Nutrition, 25, 259 – 273
doi: doi.org/10.1081/PLN-100108834

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Reduced yield? Solutions do not seem to work? Salinity and sodicity may be the problem! https://tradecorp.com.es/en/salinity-video/ Wed, 29 Jul 2020 08:52:59 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6830 Did you know that salinity and sodicity are abiotic stresses? While other environmental abiotic stresses such as heat, cold, drought and flooding can be thought of as more “transient” abiotic stresses, salinity and sodicity are what can be thought of as “permanent” abiotic stresses. They are often present from day one of the crop cycle […]

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Did you know that salinity and sodicity are abiotic stresses? While other environmental abiotic stresses such as heat, cold, drought and flooding can be thought of as more “transient” abiotic stresses, salinity and sodicity are what can be thought of as “permanent” abiotic stresses.

They are often present from day one of the crop cycle and usually increase in intensity as the crop develops across the season.

Maybe your crops are suffering from salinity and sodicity without you even knowing?

Salinity and sodicity affect between ¼ and ⅓ of global agricultural lands and it is estimated that 50% of agricultural land will be affected by 2050. Spain, the Magreb region, the Middle East, Australia and parts of Mexico, among other regions, are suffering from increased salinity and sodicity problems.

Reproduced from Energy& Environmental Science(2011) 4, 2677 with permission from the Royal Society of Chemistry

However, there is often confusion between salinity and sodicity.

  • Salinity: The accumulation of salts in the soil, the most important of these are Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Chloride (Cl) and Sulphate (S) salts
  • Sodicity: The accumulation of Sodium (Na) in the soil

Why do salinity and sodicity have such a strong impact on crop yield?

The impact of salinity and sodicity on crop yield and profitability is so strong because of the cumulative abiotic stress effect of both problems on plants. Both salinity and sodicity include many different associated stresses and may cause:

  • water imbalances in the crop that can mimic drought stress, as it is harder for the plant to absorb water from saline and sodic soils
  • reduced nutrient uptake and nutrient imbalances in the plant
  • energy deficiency due to the expenditure of energy to absorb sufficient water and excrete excess salts
  • tissue death particularly at the leaf margin and growing tip
  • less growth rate, flowering, pollen viability, fruit set and fruit quality due to the combined effects of the above factors

How can you manage salinity and sodicity?

Soil salinity and sodicity are probably the most difficult abiotic stresses to manage. Once they make their first appearance in the field, salinity and / or sodicity are likely to reappear each year as the soil properties have been fundamentally altered.

The good news is that not everything is lost. You still have an opportunity to fight back in two different ways:

  • On one hand, you can minimise the accumulation of salinity and sodicity in the soil by adapting agronomic management practices, particularly relating to water and soil.
  • On the other hand, the introduction of products, particularly Biostimulants, into crop management programs, aids crops to tolerate the increased abiotic stresses, helping to protect yield, quality and profitability.

Tradecorp’s Biostimulation 360 program is the perfect tool to overcome the abiotic stresses caused by salinity and sodicity, since their application facilitates:

  • Enhanced root development
  • Reduced transplanting and early growth problems
  • Promotes flowering and fruit set
  • Reduces fruit drop

With less salinity and sodicity stress, you can achieve increased fruit quality, more yield and most importantly greater profitability from your harvests.

Next post:

In our next post, you will learn how to develop the best strategy to overcome salinity and sodicity problems in your crops, allowing you to boost your profitability.

Stay tuned!

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Bridgepoint to sell Rovensa in €1 billion transaction https://tradecorp.com.es/en/bridgepoint-to-sell-rovensa/ Mon, 20 Jul 2020 15:43:59 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6820 17 July 2020 Partners Group, the global private markets investment manager, has on behalf of its clients agreed to acquire a major equity stake in Rovensa ("Rovensa" or "the Company"), a leading provider of specialty crop nutrition, biocontrol and protection products, from Bridgepoint, a major international private equity group. The transaction values the Company at […]

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17 July 2020

Partners Group, the global private markets investment manager, has on behalf of its clients agreed to acquire a major equity stake in Rovensa ("Rovensa" or "the Company"), a leading provider of specialty crop nutrition, biocontrol and protection products, from Bridgepoint, a major international private equity group. The transaction values the Company at an enterprise value of around EUR 1 billion.

Rovensa's portfolio of agricultural solutions and technologies helps farmers to enhance crop yields and provide food security. Founded in 1926 and headquartered in Portugal, the Company has three divisions: BioNutrition, which provides agricultural crops with nutrients for growth and healthy development; Crop Protection, which eliminates or prevents biological threats in crops; and BioControl, which offers products based on biological inputs, such as plant extracts and micro-organisms. Rovensa specializes in formulating sustainable products which reduce the environmental impact of agriculture, combat its contribution to climate change and support the cultivation of healthy food.  Its products are sold in more than 70 countries and generate an annual revenue of approximately EUR 360 million.

Following the investment, Partners Group will work closely with Rovensa's management team, led by Chief Executive Officer Eric van Innis, on several key strategic initiatives, including the accelerated development of the company's leading biological solutions portfolio, the continued internationalization of the company, and select further acquisitions to continue to build its capabilities. In addition, Partners Group plans to continue to support the company's research and development culture, focusing on high-growth market niches.

Eric Van Innis, Chief Executive Officer, Rovensa, says: "We have benefitted greatly from Bridgepoint's ownership since 2017 and our recent growth trajectory reflects this. However, with a growing global population, ambitious environmental targets, and health concerns, the agricultural sector remains essential and we believe its strategic importance ensures there are further exciting growth opportunities ahead. We are convinced that Partners Group, with its global presence and focus on entrepreneurial ownership, is the right partner with which to continue building Rovensa's platform and seize those opportunities. We look forward to working hand-in-hand with Partners Group's team in this next phase of growth and to corresponding to their trust in our project."

Andrew Deakin, Managing Director, Private Equity Directs Europe, Partners Group, states: "Rovensa represents a great opportunity to support a resilient business in a market characterized by steady long-term growth. The Company is ideally positioned to capitalize on the growing trend towards sustainable agricultural products, which will be a core element of the strategy we will continue to pursue. We were attracted to the Company's reputation, talented management team and high-quality product portfolio and see compelling potential for accelerated growth. We are very excited about this meaningful investment in Iberia and are looking forward to supporting Rovensa's continued growth journey."

Héctor Pérez, partner responsible for Bridgepoint's investment activities in the Iberian region, says: "We are extremely pleased with the progress made by Rovensa since our acquisition in 2017. Today it leads the field globally in BioSolutions and its products have become a prominent component in sustainable agriculture. The business has made a significant leap forward both through continued organic development, fueled by its product innovation capabilities, and through the execution of six strategic add-on acquisitions. We have enjoyed an extremely productive relationship with a talented management team, led by Eric van Innis and Nuno Loureiro, and are confident of the continued growth of the business in its sector."

Advisers to Bridgepoint were: HSBC, J.P. Morgan, Uría Menéndez, McKinsey and PwC.

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Exploring heat stress in crops with Prof. Antonio Ferrante and Dr. Giacomo Cocetta, from the University of Milan https://tradecorp.com.es/en/exploring-heat-stress-in-crops-with-university-of-milan/ Thu, 16 Jul 2020 13:27:38 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6812 Recently Tradecorp released some of the new insights obtained from the heat stress research programme being conducted in collaboration with the University of Milan. Today, we are speaking to Associate Professor, Prof. Antonio Ferrante and Assistant Professor, Dr. Giacomo Cocetta, who will give us their expert opinion and initial interpretations from the significance of the […]

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Recently Tradecorp released some of the new insights obtained from the heat stress research programme being conducted in collaboration with the University of Milan. Today, we are speaking to Associate Professor, Prof. Antonio Ferrante and Assistant Professor, Dr. Giacomo Cocetta, who will give us their expert opinion and initial interpretations from the significance of the results from this interesting project.

  • Name: Prof. Antonio Ferrante and Dr. Giacomo Cocetta
  • Position: Associate Professor/Assistant Professor
  • Years in current job: 4/1
  • Nationality: Italians
  • Background: Ph.D. in Horticultural Science/ Ph.D. in Plant Biology.

Question- One of the key topics of your research with Tradecorp is the mode of action of biostimulants. Biostimulants are a trending topic and understanding the way they work is a cutting-edge area of research. Did you have previous experience working with or studying biostimulants and their mode of action? Or was this an innovative project for your research team?

Answer: In our group, we had already worked on several biostimulant projects with companies as well as collaborations with other national and international research institutions. Prof. Antonio Ferrante has been working on biostimulant research for the last 15 years.

Q- This project started a few years ago and, in fact, some of the initial results were presented at the Biostimulants Congress that New AG International organised in Barcelona in November 2019. What were the objectives and expectations you defined at the beginning of the project?

A: The main objective of this project and the related activities was to evaluate the effectiveness of different algae-based and amino acids based biostimulants in managing heat stress.

 Q-In the previous question, you talked about the objectives of the project. What types of tests did you carry out for the research and how have you used the results to obtain in depth insights?

A: We adopted a combined research approach including molecular biology, physiology, histochemical and chemical tests to better understand the mode of action and also the plant response to the application of biostimulants, as well as in combination with heat stress. By using RNA sequencing technologies and bioinformatic analysis we individuated the most representative gene families, which were supposedly involved in the plant response to stress and biostimulants.

We initially studied the large amounts of information that were obtained from these analyses and some of the most important physiological pathways involved were then individuated. Based on this information, data was combined with the results of the chemical analyses (e.g. metabolites) and from the in vivo evaluation of the plants’ health status (e.g. by the analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence). Different responses to both stress and biostimulants were also observed at cellular level through the histochemical evaluation and this data was related to the variation in the expression of the relative genes and transcription factors.

 Q-In the research, one of the more advanced methods used was transcriptomic analysis which is used to obtain an in-depth understanding of how plant pathways are activated when exposed to different conditions. Do you think these analyses are useful when studying biostimulants? What kind of insights do transcriptomic analyses provide that cannot be obtained from other types of tests?

A: Yes, this strategy is particularly useful when approaching a topic that is not yet completely understood. The later individuation of genes and transcription factors potentially involved in the response to a certain factor/treatment is an option because this analysis has been performed following a non-targeted approach. Other methodologies like real time PCR (RT-PCR) gene expression analysis or analytical chemistry-based approaches work well when there is a more specific target and there are more clues on what to look for. The “omics” approach gives a much broader vision of what’s happening at the molecular level. Afterwards, further research can be performed by confirming the findings obtained with the transcriptomic analysis, using other more specific research techniques such as qPCR and biochemical assays.

Q- Through the Biostimulation 360 programme and other communication actions, Tradecorp is emphasising the importance of correct timing when applying biostimulants. What does your research reveal about the importance of timing in terms of application? Do the insights gained from different studies with other type of abiotic stress also apply in the case of heat stress?

A: The timing of biostimulant application is very important, since the efficacy of the products is related to the activation of specific pathways that belong to plants’ primary or secondary metabolisms. Earlier (biostimulant) applications can lead to a lack of response when the stress occurs, given that plants can degrade the bioactive molecules. Conversely, applications that come too late can lead to low responses, as the stress can damage the crop when inducing the physiological and biological responses.

Q- In the research carried out with Tradecorp, you have focused on the effects of heat stress on Arabidopsis thaliana. Why Arabidopsis? Will you be working with other types of plants/crops that are used in commercial agriculture?

A: Arabidopsis is one of the best plant models to be used in this kind of experiments. Its genome is well known, and the identification of genes and functions is quite easy compared to other crop species. As a first step into the identification of the main pathways involved in plant responses to these biostimulants, Arabidopsis was the right choice. Once the main mode of action and the most important pathways activated by the treatment have been identified, it will be much easier to move to a commercial crop and to try to confirm those findings.

 Q- And talking about what matters to growers, we know results can vary greatly from the lab to real field conditions. Is your research only taking place in the lab or are you also performing trials in what we could call “real field conditions”? Do you have facilities to perform these field experiments?

A: In our University and related facilities we can grow plants and carry out tests at various levels including growing chambers, experimental greenhouses as well as in open fields, under real commercial conditions.

Q- The University of Milan has been collaborating with Tradecorp on this project since 2018. What are your plans for the future? Do you have any other upcoming collaborative projects with Tradecorp? If yes, can you tell us a bit about them?

A: The next steps will be experimentation in real production contexts, by testing different biostimulant formulations on important commercial crops such as rocket and soybean. This will be based on the results and knowledge obtained from the previous experimental trials. These research activities aim to verify whether the information collected in the model plant system can be transferred to cultivated plants.

Q- Finally, could you reveal some more details from the Heat Stress project and any recent advances you have made since you presented your work in Barcelona?

A: We are now defining the last details before submitting a manuscript (for a scientific paper) outlining the most promising results from our first round of experiments and we sincerely hope that it will be published soon. A data analysis of transcriptional profiles reveals that specific pathways related to heat shock proteins (HSPs) were activated and could play a key role in the reduction of cell damage and functionality.

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49 Tradecorp products authorised by Ecocert for Organic Agriculture in 2020 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/49-tradecorp-products-authorised-by-ecocert-for-organic-agriculture-in-2020/ Tue, 14 Jul 2020 10:23:21 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6791 The list includes many of Tradecorp's main products. Some of them, such as Phylgreen and Delfan Plus V, maintain their approved status, while new products, such as IsliFe 8.2, join the list for the first time. In addition to complying with the European Union's Organic Agriculture standards, some of Tradecorp's products have also been carefully […]

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The list includes many of Tradecorp's main products. Some of them, such as Phylgreen and Delfan Plus V, maintain their approved status, while new products, such as IsliFe 8.2, join the list for the first time.

In addition to complying with the European Union's Organic Agriculture standards, some of Tradecorp's products have also been carefully formulated to comply with other Organic Agriculture regulations.  As of today, Tradecorp has: 

  • 49 products approved for Organic Agriculture under EC regulations (European Union)
  • 5 products approved for Organic Agriculture under JAS standards (Japan)
  • 5 products approved for Organic Agriculture under the NOP regulation (United States)

 

Organic Agriculture product range

The product portfolio for organic production approved by Ecocert includes many different types of solutions, for example:

  • Chelates, such as Tradecorp AZ, Tradecorp Mn and Ultraferro (EC and JAS)
  • Amino-acid-based biostimulants such as Delfan Plus V (EC and NOP)
  • Biostimulants based on fresh seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum), such as Phylgreen, Phylgreen B-Mo and Phylgreen Atlas (EC)
  • Foliar fertilisers, such as Tradebor (EC, NOP and JAS), Tradebor Mo (EC and NOP) and Final Eko (EC).

In addition, Tradecorp also holds authorisations for Organic Agriculture issued by other organisations, such as the OMRI (NOP) and FIBL certifications:

  • OMRI certification for Humistar, Humistar WG and Phylgreen
  • FIBL certification for Ultraferro (Netherlands), Phylgreen (Switzerland), Vegenergy (Germany), Phylgreen Atlas (Germany) and Phylgreen B-Mo (Germany)

 

Check out our Organic Agriculture products in:

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University of Milan: “Timing is determinant when applying different types of biostimulants to combat heat stress” https://tradecorp.com.es/en/university-of-milan-timing-is-determinant-when-applying-different-types-of-biostimulants-to-combat-heat-stress/ Thu, 09 Jul 2020 09:10:43 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6762 This is one of the key results extracted from the transcriptomic study conducted by the Department of Agriculture & Environmental Sciences at the University of Milan and Agricola 2000, in a joint project with Tradecorp. Transcriptomics is the study of RNA, which among other functions is to act as the messenger from DNA, and carry […]

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This is one of the key results extracted from the transcriptomic study conducted by the Department of Agriculture & Environmental Sciences at the University of Milan and Agricola 2000, in a joint project with Tradecorp.

Transcriptomics is the study of RNA, which among other functions is to act as the messenger from DNA, and carry the instructions for amino acid and protein synthesis in the plant. 

The research, whose preliminary results were presented by Professor Antonio Ferrante, from the Dept. of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Milan, at the 4th Biostimulant World Congress in Barcelona, draws exciting conclusions on how certain biostimulants can affect plant reactions to abiotic stresses right down to gene level. However, these biostimulants do so in different ways and by affecting different genes. Thus, applying certain types of biostimulants at precise times, taking advantage of their specific modes of action, will ensure maximum effect on the plant and, as a result, a more profitable application.

The research aimed to better understand how the growth of the model research plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, was affected when it was exposed to high temperatures and how these negative effects were mitigated by the use of biostimulants with different modes of action”, explained Prof. Ferrante. With this purpose, the study combined phenotypical methods that observe measurable changes in plant growth and plant cell structure due to heat stress, as well utilising advanced techniques, such as transcriptomic analysis of genetic functions and metabolitic analysis.

  •  Fig 1. Autofluorescence of plant cells, with Control Cells (A) on the top autofluorescing brightly indicating they had been affected by the heat stress. On the bottom (B) the same heat stress was applied. However, Phylgreen was applied before the stress. The lack of autofluorescence in B indicates the cells did not suffer the same intensity of heat stress damage or accumulation of secondary metabolites that result from stress damage, due to the correct application timing and dose of the biostimulant.

A comprehensive project to understand different types of abiotic stress

Different abiotic stresses cause different reactions within plants1. The current research is part of a larger Tradecorp project to better understand the specific reactions of plants to different abiotic stresses. The research with the University of Milan was built on previous pan European results from collaborative studies with Queens University Belfast2 and Landlab in Italy, among others. These previous studies had helped identify optimum application timing for each product and the mode of action for drought and salinity abiotic stresses.

Tradecorp decided to study heat stress with the University of Milan due to the serious agronomic problems that it causes, such as reduced yield, reduced quality and physical damage, all of which lead to saleable yield losses. “Heat stress and its management have always been a factor in agricultural production, but in the past 20 years, heat gained an increasing importance due to the ongoing effects of climate breakdown”, explains José Nolasco, Strategy and Innovation Director at Tradecorp.

Several well-known Tradecorp biostimulants were studied including Phylgreen and Delfan ranges. The Phylgreen range products are composed of fresh extracts of Ascophyllum nodosum, obtained using the exclusive Gentle Extraction process at Tradecorp’s facility in Ireland, while Delfan range is composed of high quality L-a Free Amino Acids.

The results will help determine whether the application timings of products for generalised abiotic stress are the same, or different, when a single known type of abiotic stress event is happening – such as heat stress.

The importance of timing when applying biostimulants

Timing is key when applying biostimulants because they activate certain genes in plants that help them overcome abiotic stress. For example, when a preventive biostimulant is applied at the optimal time before the stress occurs, the genes that help to reduce the negative stress chemicals in the plant are expressed or their activation intensity is amplified. This results in a strong stress prevention or reduction effect, making the plant better able to resist the abiotic stress event, which helps protect potential yield and grower profitability.

However, this gene activation or amplification triggered by the biostimulant is only temporary. Therefore, if the same preventive biostimulant is applied at the non-optimal time or, for example too far in advance of an abiotic stress event, the stress prevention effect is reduced. Even if the plant metabolism or genes are activated to resist the stress, if the stress does not occur in a specific amount of time, the plant goes back to the initial stage to save wasting energy. When the stress finally occurs, the genes are not fully active and the plant is not able to react as efficiently as a correctly timed biostimulant application. The result is some inevitable loss of potential yield.

The conventional and transcriptomic analysis proved conclusively that both Phylgreen and Delfan family products interact with plants at gene level but do so in very different ways.

Would you like to read the detailed results?

Download the complete review by filling out the following form

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References:
  1. Levitt, J. (ed) (1980) Responses of Plants to Environmental Stress, Volume 1: Chilling, Freezing, and High Temperature Stresses, Academic Press, New York
  2. Fleming Thomas R. et al. (2019) Biostimulants enhance growth and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana and exhibit chemical priming action. Annals of Applied Biology
DOI: 10.1111/aab.12482

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Download our new article “From Science to Table”! https://tradecorp.com.es/en/download-our-new-article-from-science-to-table/ Wed, 17 Jun 2020 15:58:25 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6741 We all enjoy sitting at a table full of appetizing and delicious fruit and vegetables, but have you ever wondered where the food came from, and the process that it followed to reach your table? From Science to Table is an 8-page article that deals with the question 'how can we increase food production and […]

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We all enjoy sitting at a table full of appetizing and delicious fruit and vegetables, but have you ever wondered where the food came from, and the process that it followed to reach your table?

From Science to Table is an 8-page article that deals with the question 'how can we increase food production and still deliver a sustainable agriculture?'

By 2050, the global population is projected to reach >9 billion and food production needs to increase by 50%. Over time, there is increasing consumer concern and awareness about the nutritional value of food consumed. Finding a solution, and under a changing climate, is the fundamental challenge of our time.

Science is the answer, but, what is behind science? How is science used and implemented in agricultural production? What is the research process and the factors that lead to true innovation?

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Top quality potassium means top quality harvest https://tradecorp.com.es/en/top-quality-potassium-means-top-quality-harvest/ Wed, 03 Jun 2020 09:54:00 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6726 High quality Potassium is essential to achieve best results in fruit quality. As all sources of Potassium are not the same, Tradecorp launched “K, the Key for Quality”, a campaign aimed at promoting effective Potassium options and solutions, as well as explaining the importance of this macro nutrient in crop nutrition. Why is Potassium the […]

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High quality Potassium is essential to achieve best results in fruit quality. As all sources of Potassium are not the same, Tradecorp launched “K, the Key for Quality”, a campaign aimed at promoting effective Potassium options and solutions, as well as explaining the importance of this macro nutrient in crop nutrition.

Why is Potassium the Key for Quality?

Potassium is one of the most important elements for plant development that plays an essential role in ensuring the quality of crops. Potassium is involved in many functions within the plant, and for that reason even minor deficiencies can have a large impact on the overall yield and quality of the crop.

Using a top quality Potassium can benefit your crops by:

  • Improving fruit colour, making it more attractive to the consumer
  • Increasing flavour and nutritional value thanks to its role in the translocation of sugars and nutrients
  • Optimising enzymatic activity in plants
  • Improving opening and closing control of stomata as it is the key nutrient that controls this process
  • Increasing the thickness and hardness of stems, thanks to its role in the plant lignification process
  • Increasing weight of produce
  • Increasing marketable yield
  • Maximizing the Return On Investment

Tradecorp’s Potassium specialties

After decades of research and continuous product development, Tradecorp is a benchmark company in the specialty Potassium market. Our highly efficient potassium solutions have been proven globally, providing consistent and excellent results in terms of quality and yield.

  • Final K: for high quality fruit finish with enhanced uptake due to the inclusion of anti-blocking agent. (Liquid)
  • Amifol K: for high quality fruit finish, low scorch risk and enhanced uptake due to the inclusion of L-α Free Amino Acids. (Liquid)
  • Pumma Kalidad: promotes osmotic balance in the plant, is boosted with an abiotic stress relieving biostimulant and improves sugar transport to the fruits. (Solid)
  • Folivex K: powered by Ascophyllum nodosum seaweed extract & L-α Free Amino Acids, balanced with other nutrients and target for mid-crop cycle. (Liquid)

k The Key for Quality

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Camila Levy, R&D Manager, speaks about the collaborative research projects between Tradecorp and Landlab https://tradecorp.com.es/en/colaboration-tradecorp-landlab/ Wed, 27 May 2020 13:59:53 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6707 Tradecorp recently released an infrared timelapse video that shows the “invisible” abiotic stresses caused by drought. This video was the result of a long standing collaboration between Tradecorp and Landlab, a leading Italian agricultural research centre. We speak with Tradecorp's Global R&D Manager to understand more about the collaborative research projects between Tradecorp and Landlab […]

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Tradecorp recently released an infrared timelapse video that shows the “invisible” abiotic stresses caused by drought. This video was the result of a long standing collaboration between Tradecorp and Landlab, a leading Italian agricultural research centre.

We speak with Tradecorp's Global R&D Manager to understand more about the collaborative research projects between Tradecorp and Landlab

    • Name: Camila de C. B. Levy
    • Position: Global R&D Manager
    • Years at Tradecorp: 13 (7 Tradecorp Central Office Spain, 6 Tradecorp Brazil)
    • Nationality: Brazilian
    • Background: Agronomy / Research / Project Management
    • Qualifications:
      • Agronomical Engineer (ESALQ/USP)
      • Master in Tropical Agriculture (IAC)
      • Master in Project Management, PMP (EAE)

Question – The new video is a recent example of Tradecorp’s collaboration with Landlab, but the relationship with them goes back much further, can you tell us a bit more about the history of collaboration between the two entities?

     Answer – The Strategy and Innovation Director in Tradecorp, José Nolasco, has a longstanding professional relationship with Adriano Altíssimo, CEO of Landlab. This led to a formalized collaborative contract in 2015 between our Global R&D Department and Landlab. It is a relationship that is truly pan European in scope; Tradecorp is a Spanish based company, part of our Many biostimulant discoveries resulted from this, and other collaborative projects between us, for example, better understanding of the synergies and antagonisms of different types of biostimulants when they are applied at the same time to stressed plants.

Q.-You mention some of the discoveries and benefits gained from the Landlab collaboration of the past 5 years. How has this contributed to Tradecorp’s knowhow in general?

     A.- By using Landlab’s team and expertise, our internal Global R&D Department can utilise their expertise and facilities without the need for us to recreate it inhouse. For example, the Landlab team can perform multiscreening trials in plants that gives us the capability to screen multiple raw materials, new mixes and products against our existing benchmark products. We also collaborate on in depth literature reviews, to collate current knowledge and information on new raw materials that we might incorporate into our products and portfolio. This allows us to start our research with the most up to date knowledge, avoids reinventing the wheel, as well as saving both time and money. Landlab also have excellent experience in testing our proposed new product solutions in field trials. This enables us to cover a wider geography, and climate, and ensures the solutions we bring to market work across a wide area range of different scenarios and situations.

In fact, the collaboration with Landlab has developed to the stage that it is more like a partnership. Key internal and external clients from Tradecorp have visited their facilities several times and during these visits both the Landlab team, and our Global R&D team, co-presented technical seminars. We also recently held one of our Agronomical Working Group meetings, which is a meeting of our best company agricultural experts from around the globe, at the Landlab facilities.

Q.- Apart from the infrared timelapse video about the effects of drought, what other specific projects have been developed with Landlab?

     A.- Apart from the drought timelapse video, we previously developed a different time-lapse video demonstrating the effect of Humic Acids on germinating maize seedlings roots. Many people know Humics Acids increase root growth, however this can take a long time to explain via graphs and charts during a presentation. In this video, that is only 30 seconds long, the effect of the Humic Acids is clear to see and it is a very effective way of bringing to life and visualising a topic that can be complex to explain.

Other completed projects include, several trials to check the effect of different mixtures and combinations of seaweeds and amino acids, trials and development work on some new biostimulants that we have in the pipeline, effect of drought stress in pot, plot and field trials, as well as the study of our new chelate IsliFe 8.2. We have also collaborated on full field trials in cherry, potato, grape, and several other crops as part of various projects.

Q.-And what projects are happening right now? And what projects are going to come to light in the near future?

     A.- Right now the focus is on the multiscreening drought stress trials, principally in lettuce and tomato. This helps us in the development and proofing of new products optimised to manage this type of abiotic stress. These multiscreening trials will later evolve into semi-field trials and finally full field trials that will test some of our proposed solutions. The objective is always to increase our internal company knowledge, which allows us to deliver new solutions and / or enhanced technical support to our clients enabling them to produce both sustainably and profitably.

Global R&D is also working on Abiotic Stress Projects with other collaborators, such as QUB and the University of Milan, to help manage and reduce the effect of Salinity, Flooding, Cold, Frost and Heat through optimal biostimulation and nutritional management. Within our collaborating Research Centers, there are ongoing trials to test different application timings and to optimise product positioning. This will result in clear guidance on application timings and dosage for the new solutions that we will launch in the upcoming months. We also have embryo projects that will inform new product ideas, releases, or solutions in the medium term, for example secondary metabolites of bacterial fermentation are a new and promising potential source of raw materials for the next generation of biostimulants.

In the near term in the latter half of this year, Tradecorp and Landlab will also work on a European Project.

Q.-Can you tell us a bit more about this new European project?

A.- I would love to say more, and it is a really exciting initiative, but unfortunately the information cannot be disclosed for now. Come back to me in a few months when I can talk about these specific developments and I will more than happy to share information about this new challenging project.

  • If you want to know more about the latest project between Tradecorp and Landlab on the effect of drought stress on plants analyzed with thermal camera, click here.

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Drought stress affects plants earlier than you think. Watch it on this new infrared timelapse video ! https://tradecorp.com.es/en/drought-stress-timelapse-video/ Wed, 20 May 2020 09:56:36 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6674 It is a common misconception that the most common effect of drought on plants is wilting…but in reality, this is not the case. Wilted plants are in fact close to death and visible wilting is one of the final signs for drought stress before plant death!! How do plants react to drought stress? Plants and […]

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It is a common misconception that the most common effect of drought on plants is wilting…but in reality, this is not the case. Wilted plants are in fact close to death and visible wilting is one of the final signs for drought stress before plant death!!

How do plants react to drought stress?

Plants and humans have very similar reactions to dehydration. They alter their metabolism to conserve moisture. In plants, the stomata are closed tightly to prevent water loss during transpiration and in humans the excretion of water is reduced.

As water begins to become scarce, the plant, or body, begins to implement further emergency procedures to conserve fluids. The cells are now suffering from internal stresses that are referred to as abiotic stresses.

  • Abiotic stress: Stress that is external to the plant and is non pathogenic and non biological in origin is called non-living stress or abiotic stress

Due to the heat generated by the cell’s own metabolism and the lack of transpiration, temperatures in the cells begin to rise, as can be seen in the time lapse video. At this stage of drought, the plant is not visibly wilting but is already suffering large internal metabolic stresses that, for example, reduce growth rate.

What are the effects of drought stress on plants?

These effects include:

  • reduced ability of the cell to perform normal functions and growth
  • the disruption of amino acid or protein production
  • the destruction of chemicals that are critical to normal cell function, but are sensitive to heat
  • the concentration of electrolytes or salts (osmolytes) in the cell, which can damage the mitochondria, the energy factory of the cell

As drought continues, the cells lose water because:

  • They are permeable and water escapes through the cell wall
  • Also, water from the cell is used to preserve critical functions.
  • As a result, the cells become soft or lose their “turgor” and only at this late stage does wilting become visible.

Even if water is provided at this stage, the cell may rehydrate and regain “turgor” but the cells functions may be permanently damaged and, as a consequence, will never again be able to achieve 100% function. In plants this results in reduced yield and quality of harvest.

Infrared timelapse visualization of the “invisible” abiotic stresses caused by drought

Tradecorp, in collaboration with Landlab, a leading Italian agricultural research centre, has created this new infrared timelapse video to demonstrate that these invisible drought effects, such as increased cell temperature or reduced growth rate do indeed occur, even before wilting is visible.

To visualize these effects, we recorded three sets of plants:

Plants primactiveThe infrared camera clearly demonstrates that before wilting occurs plants were suffering from abiotic stresses.

 

  • Leaf temperature of the untreated drought affected plant was the highest
  • Growth rate of the untreated drought affected plant was lower than both the plants protected with Primactive and the plants not suffering from drought stress
  • Wilting occurred first in the untreated drought affected plant, and was delayed in the ones protected with Primactive,

The Primactive effect can delay or even eliminate negative abiotic stresses that crops are exposed to during the normal crop cycle - in this example, drought stress. Leaf surface temperature was reduced compared to untreated plants, the onset of wilting was also delayed.

As a result, plants suffered less disruption and damage to their metabolic functions and the growth rate of the Primactive plants was much higher than untreated plants. Reduction of the negative effects of drought helps to protect yield and quality and thus profitability – all thanks to Primactive.

Tradecorp’s collaboration with Landlab and other research centres

Tradecorp and Landlab have a long history of collaboration and research. This infrared time-lapse video is but one example of the successful research projects that Tradecorp R&D and Landlab have been collaborating on. Tradecorp have used the expertise gained with Landab and other similar research type entities to develop a deep and internationally recognized understanding of Biostimulants and their optimum use in agriculture.

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