Tradecorp International https://tradecorp.com.es/en Expert in micronutrients and speciality fertilise Mon, 19 Oct 2020 14:44:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 Rovensa to acquire Oro Agri, a leading provider of environmentally friendly biocontrol solutions https://tradecorp.com.es/en/rovensa-to-acquire-oro-agri-a-leading-provider-of-environmentally-friendly-biocontrol-solutions/ Mon, 19 Oct 2020 14:44:20 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6987 Rovensa has agreed to acquire Oro Agri, a leading provider of environmentally friendly biocontrol solutions with international reach, from the Omnia Group.  Oro Agri has delivered an impressive track record of growth over the past two decades, supported by a high-quality portfolio of patent-protected biological products. The acquisition of Oro Agri reinforces Rovensa as the […]

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Rovensa has agreed to acquire Oro Agri, a leading provider of environmentally friendly biocontrol solutions with international reach, from the Omnia Group. 

Oro Agri has delivered an impressive track record of growth over the past two decades, supported by a high-quality portfolio of patent-protected biological products. The acquisition of Oro Agri reinforces Rovensa as the leading independent provider of biological solutions globally and further expands its geographical footprint, particularly across the US, Asia and South Africa. Rovensa looks forward to partnering with Erroll Pullen (Founder and CEO of Oro Agri) and his outstanding management team to accelerate Oro Agri’s expansion by leveraging Rovensa´s platform to exploit further growth opportunities.

Eric van Innis, CEO of Rovensa, stated: “Oro Agri has built an impressive biologicals business, with a worldwide renowned brand. Its regulatory and intellectual property strength, as well as its customer-oriented, technical go-to-market strategy with a boots on the ground approach are squarely aligned with Rovensa´s philosophy and principles. We are extremely excited to welcome Oro Agri into Rovensa. Its ambitious and talented management team, a highly promising product pipeline and the significant opportunities arising from the integration within the wider Rovensa group will be important drivers of our continued development.”

Erroll Pullen, Founder and CEO of Oro Agri, said: “It has taken us twenty years, from a one- man start-up to establishing leadership, product portfolio and distribution network across more than 75 countries. Recognition of these virtues by growers and distributors has recently opened the door for Oro Agri to significantly expand its North American distribution, doubling the number of outlets in the US. In Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia our teams are also busy with substantial distribution expansions. Being part of Rovensa is very exciting for our personnel as we see many new doors opening for the introduction of complementary products. I could not be more excited and my senior management staff is elated.“

Completion of the acquisition is expected to take place prior to 2020 year end and remains subject to the approval of the shareholders of Omnia Holdings Limited, as well as certain merger control and other clearances.

Rovensa’s portfolio of innovative agricultural solutions and technologies helps farmers enhance crop yields and provide food security. Rovensa has three divisions: BioControl, which offers solutions based on biological inputs, such as plant extracts and micro-organisms; BioNutrition, which provides agricultural crops with specialty nutrition solutions for growth and healthy development; and Crop Protection, which eliminates and prevents biological threats in crops. Rovensa specialises in formulating sustainable products which reduce agriculture’s environmental impact, combat its contribution to climate change and support the cultivation of healthy food.

Advisers to Rovensa were: HSBC, J.P. Morgan, Uría Menéndez, McKinsey, Context, PWC and ERM.

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This year, World Food Day honours the planet’s #FoodHeroes https://tradecorp.com.es/en/this-year-world-food-day-honours-the-planets-foodheroes/ Thu, 15 Oct 2020 11:25:34 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6980 This year, the slogan for World Food Day is "Grow, Nourish, Sustain. Together", and it is joined by the hashtag #FoodHeroes which seeks to put the spotlight on producers around the world who provide food to all the planet's population and who, during the COVID-19 crisis, have proved to be true heroes the world over. […]

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This year, the slogan for World Food Day is "Grow, Nourish, Sustain. Together", and it is joined by the hashtag #FoodHeroes which seeks to put the spotlight on producers around the world who provide food to all the planet's population and who, during the COVID-19 crisis, have proved to be true heroes the world over.

Thus, this year, the FAO would like to pay tribute to all farmers, distribution centre and factory workers, transporters, shop-owners and traders. At this time, the FAO believes that "it is more important than ever to support our food heroes, farmers and workers throughout the food chain, who ensure that food is delivered from farm to fork, even in times of unprecedented upheavals such as the current COVID-19 crisis".

However, on this occasion, the Food and Agriculture Organisation invites everyone to be food heroes, with a 10-point list of simple actions. The FAO encourages us to make healthy, local and seasonal food choices; to learn to grow food at home, to respect food and the environment so as to reduce waste, and to follow sound food hygiene practices.

World Food Day objectives

World Food Day was first celebrated in 1979, coinciding with the day the FAO was founded, - 16th October 1945. Since then, its aim has been to raise people's awareness of the global food problem and to boost cooperation in the fight against hunger, malnutrition and poverty.

This year, the celebration of this day coincides with a "call for global solidarity to help the most vulnerable people recover from the crisis and to make food systems more resilient and robust so that they can withstand increased volatility and the impacts of climate change, provide a healthy, affordable and sustainable diet for everybody, and decent livelihoods for those working in the food chain".

A slogan for biodiversity

In addition, this slogan –“Grow, Nourish, Sustain. Together”– responds to the FAO's annual campaign to focus on the areas most in need of change.

On this occasion, the FAO seeks to highlight the need for biodiversity. Over the course of human history, between 8,000 and 10,000 different species have been used for food. Today, around 150 are produced and commercially distributed, though only nine plants account for 66% of total crop production worldwide.

Hunger and malnutrition

Another objective of this international day is to draw attention to a long-standing issue: hunger and malnutrition in the world. According to the latest UN report, dated July 2019, 820 million people continue to go hungry, despite the fact that twice as much food is produced each year for the entire world population.

This lack of food remains the leading cause of death worldwide, according to the Global Nutrition Report, drawn up by an independent body created in 2013 that strives to achieve a world free from malnutrition in all its forms. However, malnutrition is not only caused by a lack of food, but also by inadequate nutrition. Overweight and obesity are also examples of malnutrition.

In the case of undernourishment, the figure is as high as three billion people and includes those who do not have a healthy diet, i.e. one that contains all the nutrients needed for optimal development.

Yet with the amount of food produced in the world, why are there two extremes - hunger and obesity? In the case of food shortages, UNICEF  believes that one of the main reasons why millions of people still suffer from serious food and nutrition problems is because of armed conflict. These generate food insecurity, inflated food prices, the destruction of water and sanitation systems, precariousness in health centres, and difficulties for humanitarian aid to reach the places most in need.

In addition to armed conflict, climate change is affecting many agricultural areas, especially in developing countries. Political instability in some regions also prevents the implementation of strategic measures to increase productivity and tackle hunger.

WHO recommendations

Against this background, where more than 800 million people are hungry, and 3,000 do not have a healthy diet - resulting in both malnutrition and obesity and excess weight - the World Health Organization (WHO) is working with the FAO to promote a healthy diet.

This is the best tool for preventing non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, strokes and cancer.

The WHO is committed to a diet that includes fruit, pulses and vegetables, is free of sugar and ultra-processed foods and contains a moderate amount of salt.

For its part, on World Food Day, the FAO insists on the need for appropriate nutrition: "Good nutrition is the first line of defence against disease and our source of energy for living and being active. There are many nutritional problems that are caused by a poor diet and when they affect an entire generation of children they can undermine their ability to learn, thus compromising their future and sustaining a generational cycle of poverty and malnutrition with serious consequences for individuals and nations".

To achieve this objective, the international organisation appeals to the responsibility of producers and private companies. It calls on them to ensure "that food systems can grow a variety of foods to nourish a growing population so we can sustain the planet together".

#FoodHeroes

#World Food Day

#16OctoberFood

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International Day of Rural Women: one third of the world's population calls for empowerment https://tradecorp.com.es/en/international-day-of-rural-women-one-third-of-the-worlds-population-calls-for-empowerment/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 11:10:41 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6976 On 15 October, the International Day of Rural Women, it is worth remembering the global figures for this group. According to the UN, it represents a third of the world's population. According to the FAO, it constitutes 40% of the workforce in developing countries, 20% in Latin America and over 50% in Africa and Asia. […]

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On 15 October, the International Day of Rural Women, it is worth remembering the global figures for this group. According to the UN, it represents a third of the world's population. According to the FAO, it constitutes 40% of the workforce in developing countries, 20% in Latin America and over 50% in Africa and Asia.

Despite the sheer volume of this population group, women encounter more hurdles than men. They face greater difficulties in accessing productive resources, such as land, and services such as loans and social protection. In many cases, and this is also true of developed countries, women work without pay on family farms and they have to combine their work with domestic chores that they are also responsible for.

The UN's commitment to supporting rural women takes the shape of numerous working initiatives with different states. In addition, it has a specific programme called UN Women that strives to empower women in rural settings. According to this organisation, "women are key to achieving the economic, environmental and social changes required for sustainable development."

"Empowering them is essential, not only for the well-being of individuals, families and rural communities, but also for overall economic productivity, given the large numbers of women in the agricultural workforce around the world."

This organisation is committed to this programme because it believes that "rural women guarantee food for their communities, build climate resilience and strengthen economies. However, gender inequalities such as discriminatory laws and cultural beliefs, coupled with a rapidly changing economic, technological and environmental scenario, hinder their full potential, leaving them way behind urban women and men."

Current scenario

In a recent report, UN Women highlighted the situation of women in rural areas: in Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, 60% of women work in rural areas. In the rest of Asia, the Pacific and North Africa the figure is 30%, whilst in Europe and North America it is less than 10%.

However, the way of working differs, because in African and Asian countries the economy is informal. In general, rural women have a lower standard of living, lower wages, poorer health, limited access to social services, few opportunities for social advancement and a lack of a collective voice and influence.

Furthermore, only 13% of people who own agricultural land are women, and rural women are 38% less likely to give birth with the assistance of a health professional than urban women.

Another drawback for rural women is that only 53% of the female rural population has access to safe drinking water. The outcome of not having running water is that it is women and girls who are in charge of supplying water to the family units, which stops them from going to school and from accessing independent jobs, gives them more unpaid domestic work, and puts them at a greater risk of maternal mortality, violence and psychosocial stress. In this sense, more than half of rural women do not have basic literacy skills, which leads to difficulties in finding better jobs, economic independence and social improvement.

A further consequence is that the majority of the 3.6 billion people in the world who are not connected to the internet are rural women, who are poorer and less educated.

Positive solutions

To achieve goals that improve the situation of women globally and in rural areas in particular, the UN advocates policies in each country that support decent work and social protection, education and training, access to sustainable energy and technology, access to running water and sanitation, the eradication of violence and harmful practices, the inclusion of women in decision-making and leadership in their communities, and the enhancement of women's resilience to the climate.

 Rural Women and Sustainable Development

International bodies are paying particular attention to the role of rural women in promoting sustainable development and combating climate change.

The UN's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development encompasses rural development and the empowerment of rural women and girls, and identifies them as a key stakeholder in the fight against climate change. One of the reasons for this is because women are particularly affected by climate change.

In the last speech given by the UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, precisely during the celebration of the International Day of Rural Women, the leader highlighted the role of women in the rural environment, stating that they are a "reservoir of knowledge and skills that can help communities to take advantage of low-carbon, nature-based solutions to combat what the UN considers to be the main problem of our time," referring to climate change.

For the UN, rural women are central to the recovery and application of environmentally friendly farming techniques, are green energy entrepreneurs and are "a powerful force that can drive global progress."

 

 

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We welcome our new Tradecorp France Director https://tradecorp.com.es/en/we-welcome-our-new-tradecorp-france-director/ Thu, 08 Oct 2020 15:09:24 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6969 Tradecorp has appointed Rémi Lacaille as the new Director for Tradecorp France. His main focus will be on accelerating the development of Tradecorp in France, and on adapting the company’s strategy to changes in the market. Mr. Lacaille is a great addition to the Tradecorp team. He brings to this position a strong knowledge of […]

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Tradecorp has appointed Rémi Lacaille as the new Director for Tradecorp France. His main focus will be on accelerating the development of Tradecorp in France, and on adapting the company’s strategy to changes in the market.

Mr. Lacaille is a great addition to the Tradecorp team. He brings to this position a strong knowledge of the agricultural industry and over 30 years’ experience in sales and marketing. His career has taken him to work in key companies in our market, such as DuPont, Arysta, Isagro or Indofil.

Based in the Paris region, Mr. Lacaille will travel regularly to be in contact with his team, our customers and to accelerate synergies with other companies of the Rovensa Group.

Welcome aboard Rémi!

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José Nolasco will speak about precision in timing of Biostimulant application at the New AG Africa conference https://tradecorp.com.es/en/jose-nolasco-will-speak-about-precision-in-timing-of-biostimulant-application-at-the-new-ag-africa-conference/ Mon, 28 Sep 2020 13:57:03 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6961 Jose Nolasco, Strategy and Innovation Director at Tradecorp, will delve into a new concept in abiotic stress management through the use of precision biostimulation at the New Ag International Africa virtual conference. The congress will take place from 28th September to 1st of October. As with many conferences in the past few months, the event has […]

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Jose Nolasco, Strategy and Innovation Director at Tradecorp, will delve into a new concept in abiotic stress management through the use of precision biostimulation at the New Ag International Africa virtual conference. The congress will take place from 28th September to 1st of October. As with many conferences in the past few months, the event has been moved to a 100% online setting due to the ongoing disruptions to travel caused by the COVID 19 outbreak. More than 100 companies and organisation from 36 countries are registered for the event.

 Increasing global abiotic crop stress and how to best to manage it?

With the ongoing climate breakdown, abiotic stress on crops is increasing around the world and Biostimulants are recognised as an essential tool in helping growers to manage these stresses which include salinity, drought, heat, cold, agronomic stress among others. Through our intensive Research & Development, and collaborations with leading researchers and research groups, Tradecorp is increasing emphasis on the importance of biostimulant application timing as part of our Biostimulation 360 concept. Tradecorp’s research examines how products interact with crops at a genetic and metabolomic level, and how best to communicate this information to growers and the market. These, and other results, are enabling increasingly specific recommendations on when to apply each Biostimulant type or product to manage specific stresses and maximise the Return on Investment to growers. As José will explain in his presentation, correct Biostimulation is never a cost, but an investment in future profitability.

About José Nolasco

José Nolasco currently serves as Strategy and Innovation Director at Tradecorp International, and also lectures part time as a Professor in the Agricultural Production Department at the Polytechnical University of Madrid, teaching hydroponics and crop nutrition. He is also an alumni of the Polytechnical University. He also holds a Master’s in Marketing and Business Management from the Business & Marketing School ESIC, Madrid. Jose has more than 20 years of experience working with international companies in agronomy, with an emphasis on crop management, specialty fertilisers, Biostimulants, and crop nutrition.

Do not miss out on the presentation about timing of Biostimulant application!

“A new concept on abiotic stress management through precision biostimulants with high performance” by José Nolasco

Wednesday, 30 September 2020 14:00 - 14:20

 

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The 7 major challenges in understanding humic acids https://tradecorp.com.es/en/the-7-major-challenges-in-understanding-humic-acids/ Thu, 24 Sep 2020 10:34:11 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6945 The Humic Acid market remains one of the most challenging, confusing, and least understood aspects of the global agricultural input market. Tradecorp analysed the industry in detail and highlights the 7 major challenges for the humic acid industry on this article. 1. First of all, what does the term “Humic Acids” refer to? In simple […]

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The Humic Acid market remains one of the most challenging, confusing, and least understood aspects of the global agricultural input market. Tradecorp analysed the industry in detail and highlights the 7 major challenges for the humic acid industry on this article.

1. First of all, what does the term “Humic Acids” refer to?

In simple terms “general” Humic Acids can be described as all of the various organic acids derived from humus. Humus is the organic portion of soil, which is formed from the decomposed remains of plants, animals and soil microbiota. Humic Acids can be further subdivided into Humic Acids and Fulvic Acids, however for the purposes of this article we refer to them collectively as Humic Fulvic Acids.

2. One or many different Humic and Fulvic Acids?

When a retailer or grower buys a Humic Fulvic Acid product, they are in fact buying a combination of 10’s or 100’s of different Humic and Fulvic Acids and not a singular Humic Acid or singular Fulvic Acid. When a manufacturer extracts Humic and Fulvic Acids from a raw material, such as Leonardite, the extraction contains a mixture of 1000’s of different individual types of Humic and Fulvic Acids. Within this mixture, each individual Humic Fulvic Acid has a slightly different chemical formula from the other and also a different effect on root and plant growth.

However, using conventional tests, it is difficult to separate or identify each different Humic and Fulvic Acid. What is inside the bottle is a combination of all the different individual Humic and Fulvic Acid types mixed together in one product, whereas the Humic Fulvic Acid content on the label will only reflect the total quantity.

3. The amount of Humic and Fulvic Acids in the bottle?

Nitrogen is tested, quantified and declared the same way in most countries around the world. However, when we talk about Humic Fulvic Acids, there are as many different tests for determining Humic Fulvic Acid content as there are days in the week, and each country often seems to have a different way of regulating Humic Fulvic Acids!

For example, some countries require the same standardised test be used on all Humic Fulvic Acid products, which gives some degree of cross comparison capability. However, in contrast, other countries allow different Humic and Fulvic Acids tests to be used on products that will be eventually be sold side by side.

The different Humic and Fulvic Acid tests will give different results, although they might be measuring the same thing! Differences of more than 20% are not uncommon between different testing methods and thus, there is often no way for retailers and growers to compare one product with the other, even by reading the label!

4. Manipulation of Humic and Fulvic Acid tests

All testing methods have both strengths and weaknesses and for the various Humic and Fulvic Acid tests it is no different.

One weakness that many of the tests suffer from is that if the raw material that contains Humic Fulvic Acids is micronised to a very fine size, and then added to the product, the aggressive nature of the Humic Fulvic Acids tests will detect the unextracted Humic and Fulvic Acids in the raw material, even though these may not be available for 10´s or 100´s of years.

In most cases the grower is usually paying for Humic Fulvic Acids that are readily plant / soil available and this is what should be inside the bottle… but this is not always the case.

5. Use of inconsistent language and exaggerated claims

This is responsibility of both manufacturers and governments around the world. It is common to see words such as potassium humate, humates, humus, compost, organic matter, humic dust, manure etc., - all of which mean different things - used interchangeably when talking about Humic Fulvic Acids.

High quality Humic Fulvic Acids are fantastic for improving the Physical, Chemical and Biological properties of soil, while Fulvic Acids, in particular, can have an effect on crops when applied as a foliar product. However, it is not uncommon to see exaggerated claims in marketing materials as to what a Humic Fulvic Acid product can achieve. Humic Fulvic Acids are undoubtedly fantastic products, but every product has limitations.

6. Where do Humic and Fulvic Acids originate?

It may be difficult to believe, but even today the exact natural origin of Humic and Fulvic Acids in soil is not fully understood by scientists. Humic and Fulvic Acids are somehow derived from decaying plant residues, although the exact production pathway remains unclear. They can be extracted from various sources such as coal type materials, peat, worm castings, composts and soil.

Each of these sources of Humic Fulvic Acids produces a different combination of individual Humic and Fulvic Acids. As a result, it is not correct to compare a Humic Fulvic Acid product derived from, for example, American Leonardite with one from peat or worm castings, as the quantity of Humic Fulvic Acids gives no indication as to the chemical type or quality of each product.

In most cases, legislation will demand that total Humic and Fulvic Acids are declared on the label. However, the source, quality, strengths, weaknesses, and field performance of the unrelated Humic Fulvic Acid products may be very different and affect the end result that growers obtain from their investment in these types of product.

7. Lack of consistent tests to measure the quality of Humic Acids:

Globally, almost all government testing and registration protocols focus on quantitative Humic Acids tests to determine “how much” Humic Fulvic Acids are in the bottle, rather than utilising qualitative tests that measure and focus on “the quality” of the product in the bottle.

As a consequence, it is natural for both retailers and growers to be confused particularly when looking at crop results. Applying a small quantity of high quality Humic Fulvic Acids can give very good crop results, while applying much higher volumes of a low quality Humic Fulvic Acid product will not give the same effect.

These 7 challenges combine and make accurate description of Humic Fulvic Acid products one of the biggest challenges for the global Soil Amendment sector. To find out how Tradecorp’s is responding to this and also some pointers to help you identify products that may potentially be high quality, do not miss out on our next article. Coming soon!

 

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Humic acids: a key tool to combat soil degradation https://tradecorp.com.es/en/humic-acids-a-key-tool-to-combat-soil-degradation/ Tue, 15 Sep 2020 08:59:19 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6928 Regardless of the type of soil degradation, growers tend to experience the same result: an increased risk of reduced yield and reduced quality. The FAO estimates that 38% of global cropland suffers from some form of soil degradation such as; poor soil water infiltration, reduced nutrient availability, sodification, salinisation, or adverse soil pH. All these […]

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Regardless of the type of soil degradation, growers tend to experience the same result: an increased risk of reduced yield and reduced quality. The FAO estimates that 38% of global cropland suffers from some form of soil degradation such as; poor soil water infiltration, reduced nutrient availability, sodification, salinisation, or adverse soil pH. All these issues result in the loss of soil structure and soil organic matter leading in the end to more unpredictable harvests and reduced profitability.

How to manage soil degradation?

Management of soil degradation is a very complex area as all the causes of soil degradation must be considered. However, reduced soil organic matter and loss of soil structure are the two most visible consequences of soil degradation. Therefore, focusing agronomic practices on these two areas, in both degraded soils and undegraded soils, is an obvious starting point.

The first step in managing reduced soil organic matter and soil structure is to prevent any further degradation of the soil. The second is to then work towards reversing the original causes of the soil degradation.

Pros and cons of the application of composts

The most obvious way to help reduce the loss of soil organic matter is through the application of crop residues and compost back to the soil, and this should always be encouraged. This can be achieved by adding harvest residues directly back to soil at harvest, by growing cover crops in the off season or through the addition of composts. Composts are an excellent source of fibre and nutrients for healthy soil microbiota and plant growth, and essentially also contain dilute forms of Humic Acids. All of these components are beneficial to soil structure.

Certain quality control factors are very important in the manufacture of compost, such as ample heat during the composting process to kill any pathogens and reduce the number of viable weed seeds, and also ensuring that there are low sodium and chloride levels in the final compost. Unfortunately, the addition of composts alone is not always an economic solution. For example, composts are a bulky material and costly to transport over large distances. As a result, most of the compost produced globally is consumed locally, near the site of production and not in the regions that could most benefit from its application.

Application of Humic Acids to combat soil degradation

Humic Acids on the other hand, which are present in small quantities in compost, can also be obtained from other sources and concentrated. This allows for an economic transportation throughout the agricultural supply chain, to areas where they are needed.

The manufacture of high-quality Humic Acid products is a key area of focus for Tradecorp. In fact, one of our very first products was a Humic Acid product named Humifirst / Humistar, which is derived from American Leonardite. While the use of Humic Acids is now considered common in agriculture, in 1985, it was still a very novel concept, making Tradecorp a pioneer company in the development and promotion of Humic Acids in European agriculture. In fact, to this day Humistar is still a top product that is used globally.

When soil organic matter is lost from soil, Humic Acids are also lost. Soil organic matter and Humic Acids together play a fundamental role in the maintenance of a good soil structure. When soil organic matter and Humic Acid levels are reduced or lost from soil, the soil loses the “glue” or “web” that holds and binds soil together, resulting in a weakened or collapsed soil structure, as demonstrated in the video and explained in the graphics below.

The interaction between the web of the Humic Acids and soil or clay particles is knowns as the Clay – Humic Complex (CHC). This Clay Humic Complex is fundamental in maintaining the stability of soil aggregates and thus the soil structure.

soil degradationBenefits of the application of humic acids

It is easy to see in the previous simplified illustration how soil organic matter and Humic Acids help to hold the soil together, resulting in a soil structure that;

  • facilitates water infiltration during rain and irrigation;
  • provides a reservoir of nutrients and fibre for plant and healthy microbial growth
  • reduces soil erosion;
  • increases water storage capacity helping sustain crop growth during summer or dry periods
  • allows for pore spaces between soil particles for roots to grow and absorb nutrients.

 

So, what happened when the Humic Acids were added to the soil in the video?

A number of different factors come into play when adding the Humistar to the soil in the video.

  • First, dry soil tends to be “hydrophobic” or repel water. However, the Humic and Fulvic Acids in Humistar are multi polar, meaning they have both positive and negative charge sites. This allows the liquid solution to overcome the water repelling effect on the dry soil surface and quickly soak into the soil, whereas the water alone sits on the stop of the soil for longer before finally soaking into the soil
  • Next, the Humic and Fulvic Acids then interact with the soil surface and help re-establish some of the lost Clay-Humic-Complex. This increases the stability and structure of the soil as demonstrated by the comparison with soil and water alone, which slumps once taken out of the cup
  • Finally, the newly formed Clay-Humic-Complex is better at retaining water, which would then be more available to plants, as can be seen by the loss of the water from the slumped soil into the paper. This water had “entered” the soil but had not “soaked” onto the hydrophobic soil surfaces.

The market of humic acids, however, can be confusing. Are all humic acids the same? Do they provide similar results? How to assess the quality of humic acids? Do not miss the answers to these and more questions on our next article!

+ Tradecorp’s portfolio of humic acids

+ Success stories with Tradecorp’s humic acids

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Phosphites act as potent Biostimulants, by encouraging root development and improving Nitrogen assimilation https://tradecorp.com.es/en/phosphites-act-as-potent-biostimulants/ Tue, 08 Sep 2020 07:39:02 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6916 Since 2018 the Phosphite Biostimulant Stewardship Group (PBSG) has aimed to ensure the continued responsible use of Phosphites for Biostimulation of Plants, particularly in the context of the new EU fertilising regulations (Regulation (EU) 2019/1009). To this aim the PBSG group works with scientists and researchers from both industry and academia to promote scientific based […]

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Since 2018 the Phosphite Biostimulant Stewardship Group (PBSG) has aimed to ensure the continued responsible use of Phosphites for Biostimulation of Plants, particularly in the context of the new EU fertilising regulations (Regulation (EU) 2019/1009). To this aim the PBSG group works with scientists and researchers from both industry and academia to promote scientific based evidence to stakeholders such as European Regulators. Tradecorp is one of six founding members of the PBSG group.

Phosphites are potent Biostimulants

Most recently this has led to the publication of a white paper by the School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) in the UK. The research demonstrates multiple Biostimulant effects of phosphites on plants including

  • Enhanced root biomass and enhanced root architecture
  • Improved Carbon assimilation by crops
  • Increased water use efficiency
  • Increased production of Nitrate reductase

This new information has increased understanding of the mode of action of Phosphites as plant Biostimulants and helps to further explain the increased yield and quality effects associated with their use.

The results demonstrated that, both in wheat and oilseed rape, the effect of Phosphites was more pronounced under mild abiotic stresses. In this research these stresses were created by restricting water availability (drought simulation) or by reducing nutrient strength (simulation of reduced fertiliser inputs).

Interesting research findings

At 100%, 75% and 50% nutrient strength Phosphites showed a clear trend of increasing root biomass (significantly in the 75% treatment), root length, root volume and lateral root development. These all resulted from the stimulation by Phosphites and further work is now underway to better understand these exciting findings

Separately, production of Nitrate Reductase in oilseed (canola), and wheat, was increased by Phosphite Biostimulation. Nitrate Reductase is essential in the conversion of Nitrate (often contained in Nitrogen fertilisers) to Nitrite, to Ammonium and Glutamine – one of the foundation Amino Acids. Glutamine then serves as the foundation for the production of proteins in the plant. Thus, Phosphites have a clear role in promoting increased fertiliser use efficiency which have both positive financial effects for farmers as well as the environment.

It is clear that Phosphites have multiple and diverse modes of action as Biostimulants on both the root and aerial parts of plants. The new EU fertilising product regulation EU 2019/1009, which will be fully applicable on 16th July 2022, is ground-breaking for the agricultural input industry. Most specifically, a new defined category is included alongside the more traditional categories of fertilisers and pesticides,  biostimulants. However, Phosphites are excluded from both the proposed Biostimulant category as well as from any fertilising product.

Pan European Project

Led by Associate Professor Dr. Ranjan Swarup (University of Nottingham, UK) and in collaboration with Kiel University (Germany), a systematic approach involving a combination of cell biology, plant physiology, biochemistry and X ray imaging techniques were utilised to give a detailed analysis of the changes induced by Phosphite Biostimulation and more research is ongoing.

Implications of the findings

This research, as well as other pre-existing research, clearly demonstrate that Phosphites have a direct Biostimulant effect on plants. This scientific knowledge is confirmed by practical farmer, as well as market, knowledge about Phosphites, where they are well known as strong plant Biostimulants. With increasing global population growth compounding the environmental need for more sustainable food production through producing more with less inputs, the exclusion of Phosphites from the Biostimulant and fertilising categories appears to be a contradiction to these European and global goals.

Full details are contained in the White Paper that can be read in full here

 

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SUCCESS STORY: Increasing profitability using a Tradecorp salinity and sodicity management program https://tradecorp.com.es/en/the-solution-tradecorp-salinity-and-sodicity-program/ Thu, 20 Aug 2020 09:51:42 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6879 Between 25 - 35% of worldwide agricultural lands are affected by salinity and sodicity which are two of the most difficult abiotic stresses to manage. Below we present a case study of a grower from Australia who used a Tradecorp salinity and sodicity management program. The strategy used products from the locally available portfolio and […]

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Between 25 - 35% of worldwide agricultural lands are affected by salinity and sodicity which are two of the most difficult abiotic stresses to manage.

Below we present a case study of a grower from Australia who used a Tradecorp salinity and sodicity management program. The strategy used products from the locally available portfolio and was adapted to the specific field situation by the local Tradecorp Australia team.

2020 Broccoli infographic Australia Silinity Trials

The problem: Field Situation

Soil salinity and sodicity affects about 50% of Australia’s agricultural land. This Tradecorp program was used in Queensland in a clay loam soil that is naturally rich in Potassium and has a high natural fertility. Soils in the area are traditionally used for cultivating vegetable and root crops.

In recent years, the soil in the area has suffered from increasing salinity, partly due to the irrigation water, which also suffers from high salinity, in particular dissolved Sodium and Chlorides. Growers in the region practice good salinity and sodicity agronomic management practices, such as regular applications of Gypsum. However, due to limited rainfall the problem is increasing year on year.

The soil at study site (5 ha, Control - existing program, 5 ha Tradecorp program) was classified as highly / severely saline, and the irrigation water contained high Sodium and Chlorides and was classified as Class 4 (both classifications were under Australian standards). The soil had an organic matter content of 2 – 3%, high NPK, Calcium, Magnesium and micronutrient status. Soil EC was high at ~150 mS/m, had high Chlorides, Sodium was also high, bordering on sodicity. Overall the site of the study is representative of the soil conditions in the region in general.

The solution: Tradecorp salinity and sodicity program

The Tradecorp Australia team developed a salinity and sodicity strategy adapted to the local field and crop situation. The program consisted of:

  • Humifirst WG & Saltrad (soil applications)
  • Delfan Plus & Phylgreen (foliar applications)

The program was applied to transplanted Broccoli, (a moderately salt sensitive crop) that is grown under drip irrigation.

Dosage

  • Humifirst WG       5kg /ha      4 applications      1, 4, 7 and 9 weeks after planting
  • Saltrad       30L /ha      3 applications       1, 5  and 8 weeks after planting
  • Delfan Plus       4L /ha      3 applications      3, 5 and 7 weeks after planting
  • Phylgreen       2L /ha      4 applications      3,6 and  8 weeks after planting

The results: Outstanding outcome in yield and quality with Tradecorp salinity and sodicity program…

During crop growth, parameters such as root length and stem diameter were positively increased - indicating the benefits of the Tradecorp salinity and sodicity program during the growth phase. The crop was hand harvested, as is typical for Broccoli, and tracked through the processing and packing facility.

Total yield

At the first cut-out, yield was increased +34%, both through higher head weight, as well as a higher cut-out percentage.

At the second cut-out, yield was increased +38% giving a net total yield increase of +35%. The cut out was high enough in the Tradecorp Program that a 3rd cut was not necessary, and this also eliminated the labour cost associated with this.

Analysis of the data indicated that in addition to the higher yield achieved through the extra cut-out of the crop (almost 4000 extra heads were harvested /ha), the quality of the individual heads was also improved as outlined below.

Fig. 1 Quality Parameters - Head Size Distribution

Heads in the 140mm – 150 mm size category were increased 600% and heads in the undersize (<110 mm) category were reduced from 5% to 0 (Fig. 1).

 Fig. 2 Quality Parameters – Head Weight Distribution

The larger head sizes also translated into higher individual head weights with 10% of heads >500 g in the Tradecorp Program compared to 0% in the Control. Similarly, at the other end of the scale heads >300g were reduced from 15% in the Control to 5% in the Tradecorp Program.

…and also a great Return on the Investment (ROI)

The crop was tracked through the processing and packing facility and the Return on Investment (ROI) calculated. For every AU$1 the grower invested in Tradecorp products to manage salinity and sodicity, the grower recovered this investment, and also made an extra profit of AU$1.5 (ROI 1:1.5) indicating the financial benefit of working with your local Tradecorp team, and portfolio, to overcome agronomic problems specific to your local situation.

How can the incredible results of the Tradecorp salinity and sodicity program be explained?

From the 7 tips outlined for a Gold Standard salinity and sodicity management program, 4 were included in this particular program:

  • The application of Humifirst would have explained a large proportion of the increased root growth observed, while Saltrad would have reduced Sodium in the root zone. Both of these effects would have improved water and nutrient dynamics in the growing crop increasing growth and yield potential.
  • The regular applications of Phylgreen, with its Primactive effect, would have enabled the crop to better resist the abiotic stress effects of salinity and sodicity, for example, through increased gene signalling in the plant to make specific proteins that help reduce the negative growth effects of damaging oxidative chemicals released inside the plant during stress.
  • Similarly, the regular applications of Delfan Plus would have brought extra energy to the plant across the growing cycle. This would have helped the crop to maintain growth rate in these high stress growing conditions. Delfan Plus´ mode of action would also have helped preserve the correct functioning of plant metabolism, for example via the continued production of secondary metabolites that can help the plant better resist stress.

Tradecorp local teams can help with your results!

Should you have any questions in how to manage Salinity and Sodicity in your crop, how to better manage Abiotic Stress in general or other agronomic needs, our local team is ready to assist you. Please get in contact with your local representative. Contact us.

References:

  1. Commonwealth Government of Australia, Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment. Australia State of the Environment 2016. https://soe.environment.gov.au/theme/land/topic/2016/soil-salinity-and-acidification
  2. Shannon, MC, and Grieve CM. (1999) Tolerance of Vegetable crops to Salinity. Scientia Horticulturae 78, 5 – 38. https://www.ars.usda.gov/arsuserfiles/20360500/pdf_pubs/P1567.pdf

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7 tips for a gold standard salinity and sodicity management program https://tradecorp.com.es/en/7-tips-for-a-gold-standard-salinity-and-sodicity-management-program/ Thu, 06 Aug 2020 10:35:26 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=6865 Salinity and sodicity could be affecting your crops without you even knowing! Between 25 - 35% of worldwide agricultural lands are affected by these two abiotic stresses, which are also probably the two most difficult to manage. However, there are 7 tips that can help you counteract the negative effects of salinity and sodicity. Continue […]

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Salinity and sodicity could be affecting your crops without you even knowing! Between 25 - 35% of worldwide agricultural lands are affected by these two abiotic stresses, which are also probably the two most difficult to manage.

However, there are 7 tips that can help you counteract the negative effects of salinity and sodicity. Continue reading to learn how to develop this gold standard program!

 

1. Start with the soil

Often overlooked in salinity and sodicity management, early application to soil of Humic Acid products like Humifirst / Humistar or Turbo Root should be one of the key foundations of any salinity and sodicity management program. Salinity and sodicity reduce root biomass, and with less roots the crop has less surface area to absorb water and nutrients.

Humic Acids increase root growth and absorption selectivity while also helping improve Sodium tolerance.

Tradecorp’s research with Italian Research Centre, Landlab, has demonstrated the astonishing effect of Humistar / Humifirst on root growth rate and biomass as shown in this time-lapse video.

2. Counteract the Potassium uptake problem

Salinity and sodicity reduce Potassium uptake from the soil and this often creates Potassium – Sodium imbalances in the crop tissue. As the crop is already facing difficulties in absorbing sufficient water, and nutrients, from the salty soil solution regardless of the quantity of nutrients in the soil, applications of high quality foliar Potassium, such as Final K or Amifol K, bypass these problems and help ensure the crop is adequately nourished with Potassium.

3. Boost the energy of the crop

Crops have some ability to excrete excess salinity and sodicity both directly and indirectly… but this takes a lot of energy and can result in crop energy deficits that reduce growth and eventually yield.

The foliar application of Amino Acid products from the Delfan and Aton families help give crops a boost in energy which enables increased production of proteins related to abiotic stress management. This helps the crop maintain growth while also reducing the tendency to abort flowers and fruit as the crop tries to save energy, which as growers know, is a very common problem in saline and sodic soils.

4. Prevent the effects of abiotic stress with Primactive products

Biostimulants with a Primactive effect prepare or “prime” crops to increase their tolerance to abiotic stress. However, correct timing of biostimulant application is critical to ensure maximum effect. This is particularly important in the case of biostimulants with Primactive effect.

As salinity and sodicity are “permanent” stresses, there is no start or finish to the stress, making prevention or priming type application a bit different. Tradecorp recommends applying products with Primactive effect, such as Phylgreen, by fractionation, spray little and often to the crop, where cases of salinity and sodicity are suspected or known. In these situations the objective is to help reduce the abiotic stress effect across the entire crop cycle.

Fractionation type application will not only help the crop better resist abiotic stress along the cycle via the Primactive effect, but also provides key compounds such as mannitol. These natural compounds are called “compatible osmolytes” and help reduce the damage to plant cells and genetic structure that results from salinity and sodicity induced drought stress caused by decreased water absorption as mentioned above.

5. Reduce salinity and sodicity in the root zone

Active management of salinity and sodicity in the root zone can help increase profitability without incurring the cost of treating the whole soil area. Solutions specifically designed to tackle the saline root zone, Saltrad for example, are effective solutions that enable farmers to continue profitable production.
Saltrad has been designed to tackle salinity and sodicity through multiple modes of action in the soil. For example, the Organic Acids contained in Saltrad preferentially lift Sodium from the soil surface resuspending it back into the soil solution - in effect washing the surface of the soil free from Sodium. The washed soil surface is then covered and protected with highly soluble Calcium that is present in Saltrad helping to restore the natural soil structure and this improves growers ability to wash or leach the Sodium down below the root zone by leaching irrigations or during heavy rainfall.

6. Leach soluble salts below the root zone

Did you know that 1 megalitre of water that is saline to 1ds /m (640 mg / kg or 640 ppm) contains 640 kg of salts and these will be deposited on the land during the irrigation?
Irrigation water, although key for crops, often brings the unwanted side effect of naturally dissolved salts, particularly Sodium and Chloides, and this is why salinity and salinity can appear quickly in soils under irrigation.

And did you know that in addition to salts, irrigation water usually contains dissolved bicarbonates and that these bicarbonates solubilise Calcium from the surface of soil particles?
These bicarbonates increase leaching of Calcium down below the root zone with the position in the soil previously occupied by the Calcium now replaced with the Sodium in the irrigation water.

These combined processes accelerate the build-up of salinity and sodicity!

With this in mind, the elimination of Bicarbonates from irrigation water, with products like Lower 7, is key to reducing Calcium leaching and helps to slow down the build-up of salinity and sodicity in soils.

7. Back to basics - don´t forget your micronutrients

When managing salinity and sodicity it is easy to forget the basics. In addition to reducing macronutrient uptake such as Potassium and Phosphorus, salinity and sodicity reduce the uptake of most micronutrients, making it very common for crops to suffer from the “hidden” hunger of micronutrient deficiency.

Soil tests will often show adequate reserves of micronutrients but under the stressful growing conditions of salinity and sodicity, micronutrient absorption is reduced, which increases the chance of sub-optimal yield and quality and thus reduced profitability.

Avoid the risk of hidden hunger using Tradecorp´s EDTA/EDDHA Chelates. EDTA / EDDHA chelates are recognised as the most effective micronutrient type for use in soils and help ensure sufficient uptake of the nutrient by plants and they are also ideal for foliar application due to their excellent tank-mixing properties.

The benefits of the 7 tips outlined above in salinity and sodicity management are cumulative, combing most, or all, will give maximum benefit and profitability.

Next article- Case study from client using Tradecorp´s Integrated Salinity and Sodicity Management Program

In the next article Tradecorp will present a case study from a client in Australia who has benefited from using Tradecorp´s Integrated Salinity and Sodicity Management Program.

References:

1. Khaleda, L. P. (2017). Humic Acid Confers HIGH-AFFINITY K+ TRANSPORTER 1-Mediated Salinity Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis. Molecules and Cells, 40, 966-975.
doi: doi.org/10.14348%2Fmolcells.2017.0229

2. Merwad, A. (2017). Effect of humic and fulvic substances and Moringa leaf extract on Sudan grass plants grown under saline conditions. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 97, 703 - 716.
doi: doi.org/10.1139/cjss-2017-0050

3. DPI NSW. (2014). Farm water quality and treatment. Sydney: Department of Primary Industries, New South Wales State Government.

4. Gangloff, W. W. (2006). Relative availability coefficients of organic and inorganic Zn fertilizers. Journal of Plant Nutrition, 25, 259 – 273
doi: doi.org/10.1081/PLN-100108834

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