Tradecorp International https://tradecorp.com.es/en Expert in micronutrients and speciality fertilise Mon, 07 Jun 2021 10:26:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 Adjufirst: Adjuvant range for use with fertilisers https://tradecorp.com.es/en/adjufirst-adjuvant-range-for-use-with-fertilisers/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 10:22:51 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7717 An adjuvant is a product that optimises the efficacy of another. The adjuvant itself does not actually contain the component that it is boosting the efficacy of. Tradecorp’s Adjufirst range is specifically recommended for inclusion with fertilisers during their application to improve their uptake and efficacy. There are obvious benefits: Unfortunately, fertilisers are sometimes overapplied […]

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An adjuvant is a product that optimises the efficacy of another. The adjuvant itself does not actually contain the component that it is boosting the efficacy of. Tradecorp’s Adjufirst range is specifically recommended for inclusion with fertilisers during their application to improve their uptake and efficacy.

There are obvious benefits:

  • Benefits to the environment: more of the fertiliser applied is taken up by the plant and therefore not available to leach into waterways
  • Benefits to the crop: nutritional management will be improved
  • Benefits to growers: the money invested on fertiliser inputs has the maximum chance of improving crop yield, quality and thus the grower’s profitability

Unfortunately, fertilisers are sometimes overapplied when their use efficiency in the crop is low. The Adjufirst range allows for more of the applied fertiliser to be absorbed by the crop enhancing yield potential, or alternatively due to higher uptake the grower may decide to reduce the quantity of their fertiliser inputs. Both of these positive outcomes fit with Tradecorp´s goal of helping growers produce more with less, as part our goal of promoting “Well Balanced Agriculture”.

 

How do adjuvants work?

Adjuvants like Adjufirst work by helping to reduce the limiting factors that occur during product application, most typically during foliar spray applications and also increasingly during soil applications. Factors that can limit successful applications of fertilisers include:

  • Adverse climate / weather
  • Poor water quality
  • Specific agronomic management practices
  • Incorrect droplet size
  • Lack of sprayer maintenance

 

Adjuvants offer solutions for growers in three beneficial areas:

  1. Technical benefits

  • Reducing factors that limit  successful treatments in the field  e.g. reduced water volume (Figure 1)
  1. Economic benefits:

  • Higher Return on Investment (ROI) across the board
  1. Environmental benefits:

  • More of the applied product ends up where it is supposed to be
Figure 1 Adjuvants

Figure 1. Foliar spraying coverage comparing different volumes of water vs water + adjuvant

 

Benefits derived from using adjuvant products like Adjufirst are applicable in the fertiliser spray or fertigation tank, during spraying or during soil application, as well as directly on the crop.

In the treatment tank, adjuvants mainly act on two factors.

  1. They directly influence protection of the fertiliser from interactions in mixes due to adverse pH control of the treatment broth and water hardness.
  2. They act and modify the nutrient complexation process, for example helping to prevent cations in hard waters (Ca++, Mg++, Fe+++, Si++++, etc.) from interacting with fertiliser components

 

During the spraying process, adjuvants improve the physicochemical characteristics of the application. For example by influencing or improving:

  • Spreading – via reducing the surface tension of droplets (Figure 2)
  • Penetration – facilitates improve passage of the fertiliser into plant tissue
  • Retention – reduces runoff and losses of foliar fertiliser into the soil
  • Sticking – sticks nutrients to the leaves
  • Moistening – captures humidity from the air and extends droplet lifespan increasing available absorption time
  • Diffusion – facilitates plant translocation of nutrients
  • Drift control – improves the performance and precision of spray applications via optimum droplet size
  • Anti-leaching – protects from rainfall

 

Figure 2 Adjuvants

Figure 2. Differences between a drop water (left) and a drop water + adjuvant (right)

 

Finally, the adjuvants improve fertiliser efficiency directly in the crop via:

  • Better retention in irregular / non uniform plant shape
  • Improves spreading on the foliar surface
  • Adds penetration properties on foliar cuticle / thickness
  • Facilitates spreading, wettability and retention on hydrophobic crop leaves (Figure 3)
  • Persistence which improves fertiliser uptake efficacy along with for a longer period of time. This helps limit other adverse factors (long flight distances, humidity, cuticle waxes, etc.).
  • Reduces the risk of drift away from the crop

 

Figure 3 Adjuvants

Figure 3. Drop effects on a hydrophobic leaf surface; Right leaves show only water, left leaves have adjuvants

 

Tradecorp International has a wide range of agricultural adjuvants, with the objective of improving the range of agronomic options available to Growers. This is all within a consumer and agricultural market that is increasingly demanding. This will further strengthen Tradecorp´s agricultural solutions portfolio demonstrating our clear commitment to continue being the benchmark in the bionutrition market

Adjufirst range

Adjufirst Pre

A super spreading adjuvant for the increasingly dynamic soil application market that:

  • improves soil penetration
  • ensures horizontal and vertical fertiliser distribution on the ground, improving coverage with less water volume.

Adjufirst  Fol

A triple use adjuvant, combining spreading, retention and penetration with high performance on hydrophobic leaves and safer for crops than classic oils.

Adjufirst Oleo

Organically-sourced vegetable adjuvant. It is made from sunflower (oil properties) and sugar beet (adjuvant properties).

Adjustar 2 in 1

Dual-action adjuvant: water corrector + adjuvant.

  • Helps to solubilise fertilisers in mix tank
  • Safeguards compatibility and stability

Adjustar Ancora

Ultra-concentrated sticker adjuvant containing pine terpene. Its high concentration allows for a low dose rate of 0.05% (2.8 – 4 times lower dose /ha compared to other similar products).

 

Contact us to find out more about Adjufirst

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Crop growth stress: the use of biostimulants beyond environmental stress  https://tradecorp.com.es/en/crop-growth-stress-the-use-of-biostimulants-beyond-environmental-stress/ Thu, 27 May 2021 06:48:22 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7688 Certain biostimulants have very specific roles in helping prevent and recover crops from environmental and weather stresses.  However, a different source of stress in crops is the stress that occurs each time the crop passes through a growth stage, for example changing from the germination stage to the vegetative stage, changing from the vegetative stage to the flowering […]

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Certain biostimulants have very specific roles in helping prevent and recover crops from environmental and weather stresses. 

However, a different source of stress in crops is the stress that occurs each time the crop passes through a growth stage, for example changing from the germination stage to the vegetative stage, changing from the vegetative stage to the flowering stage, etc. 

Similar to Primactive and Curactive Biostimulants, there are specific Biostimulants that target, and help to reduce, each of these specific crop growth stresses. 

 

Humic and fulvic acids for root growth

 

Humic and fulvic acids help in the recovery of the degraded structure of soils, in the retention and availability of nutrients in soil, and facilitate improved soil moisture retention, among other functions. Humic and fulvic acids, such as Humistar / Humifirst, have also been shown to have a direct biostimulation effect on crops, in particular by triggering increased root growth that facilitates improved overall crop performance (Szczepanek & Wilczewski 2011). This biostimulation effect is particularly beneficial in the early stages of growth, when more root development is desired, such as during the germination phase, during transplant, during vegetative growth phases and at the breaking of root dormancy in perennial crops. 

Biostimulants can also be incorporated into formulations that contain specific nutrients, such as the incorporation of Humic and Fulvic Acids with the Phosphorus, Nitrogen and micronutrients needed for early and vigorous crop development, as in Tradecorp’s Turbo Root.

In this example, the synergy between Biostimulants and specific crop nutrition reduces transplant shock and promotes vigorous early growth demonstrating how knowledge of both biostimulants and crop nutrition, when appropriately combined, bring maximum benefit to crops.

Another risk factor during the early phases of crop growth is excess vegetative growth, which can reduce root development. This is a particular risk where basal doses of Nitrogen have been applied to the soil. Specific Biostimulant products that promote balanced root and shoot development have an important role during this growth period, for example Ruter AA V. In this product, the key for this balanced root and shoot development is the combination of amino acids with nutrients favouring balanced early growth, such as Phosphorus and Potassium, as well as Molybdenum to enhance the plant metabolism of the applied basal Nitrogen fertiliser.  

 

Biostimulants for enhanced flowering / fruit set 

As crops change from vegetative growth to flowering and then fruit set, a large biophysical and biochemical change is produced, and stress is triggered, in the crop. During these phases of growth, specific targeted Biostimulants can have a very strong effect on flower number, fertility and fruit set. 

Targeted biostimulants to benefit crop growth during these critical growth phases often have a seaweed or amino acid base, as both of these biostimulant classes have beneficial effects on either flower number, pollen vitality or pollination success. From a nutritional standpoint, Boron and Molybdenum are key nutrients demanded by the crop at this growth stage. Therefore, it is logical to develop a product that combines one of the biostimulant raw materials with Boron and / or Molybdenum to produce a combination biostimulant / nutritional product, for example Florastart or Phylgreen B-Mo.

 

By taking this approach, it is easier for growers to ensure they are giving optimal nutritional and biostimulation to their crop at this key growth stage using a single product. This avoids the need or confusion of having to mix and apply multiple different biostimulant and nutritional products that costs the grower time and increases the risk of an adverse tankmix

This scenario is a good example of the development of the biostimulant market overall. Whereas in the early days of biostimulant use it was more common to apply a pure biostimulant and then mix it with other nutritional products, it is now usual to apply a single premixed product that contains both. 

 

 

Biostimulants and better fruit fill 

During fruit fill the diversion of energy to fill the fruit and produce viable seeds results in increased internal crop stress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biostimulant with yet different modes of action are often beneficial during this stage, such as biostimulants that enhance the transport of sugars, like Amifol K, or solutions that promote fruit fill and quality thanks to added Calcium, like Phylgreen Electra

Other options, promote fruit fill, while containing biostimulants that focus on reducing the negative effect of adverse temperature and reducing the effect of free radicals (also known as Reactive Oxygen Species – ROS). Free radicals have many negative effects on crops such as reducing amino acid and thus protein content. 

 

What’s next for biostimulants? 

 In little under a decade, the use of biostimulants has grown from almost zero to become a multi-billion dollar industry. Knowledge about the use and function of biostimulants has also increased at an exponential rate.  

First came the knowledge about which products had biostimulant effects, then came increasing knowledge about the mode of action and how biostimulants work inside the crop. This has enabled increasingly precise recommendations regarding timing and dosage of biostimulant applications and has led to more consistent results and greater returns on investment for growers. 

The use of biostimulants in agronomic programs continues to expand globally as this new knowledge is applied. At the same time, a new generation of biostimulants are currently under development, harnessing the knowledge gained during the past decade and including new sources of raw materials and incorporating novel aspects, such as ultra-low dosages and ultra-efficiency.  

As a result, the use of biostimulants will continue to expand in this new decade gaining an increasing importance in assisting agriculture be more sustainable while at the same time helping to increase yield and quality to feed the growing global population. 

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Climate change threat to tea cultivation https://tradecorp.com.es/en/climate-change-threat-to-tea-cultivation/ Thu, 20 May 2021 13:47:41 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7650 Tea, made from the Camellia Sinesis plant, is one of the world’s oldest and most widely consumed beverages, second only to water. It has health properties and promotes wellbeing thanks to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and weight loss effects. In recognition of the long history and profound cultural and economic importance of tea worldwide, the United […]

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Tea, made from the Camellia Sinesis plant, is one of the world’s oldest and most widely consumed beverages, second only to water.

It has health properties and promotes wellbeing thanks to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and weight loss effects.

In recognition of the long history and profound cultural and economic importance of tea worldwide, the United Nations General Assembly declared 21 May as International Tea Day and asked the FAO to take the lead in this observance.

Tea production and processing is a basic economic source of income for millions of families in developing countries. In addition, the tea industry is a major source of export earnings for some of the world’s poorest countries and creates jobs in remote and economically depressed areas. The sale of tea generates wealth that goes to buy food in countries such as Kenya.

 

Tea in the world

According to the FAO report “Current market situation and medium term outlook” published in May 2018, the largest producers of black tea in 2017 were India with 1,260,000 tonnes, Kenya with 439,850, Sri Lanka with 305,000 and China with 310,000, while the forecast outputs for 2027 are 1,617,871, 605,915, 370,379, and 554,331 tonnes, respectively.

The report states that global tea production in 2017 stood at 3,333,316 tonnes and forecasts a yield of 4,420,015 tonnes in 2027. Yet the projection for green tea output, with an expected volume of 3,653,792 tonnes in 2027, is somewhat lower.

The main consumption countries for black tea in 2017 were India with a total of 1,040,000 tonnes, China with 302,353 tonnes and Pakistan with 172,911 tonnes, and this is expected to increase to 1,264,359, 541,310 and 250,755 tonnes, respectively, according to the FAO’s projections for 2027.

On the export side, the largest exporter of black tea in 2017 was Kenya with 400,000 tonnes, Sri Lanka with 281,840 and India with 240,680 tonnes, while Kenya is expected to export 524,140 tonnes in 2027, Sri Lanka 335,522 and India 362,932 tonnes.

There are many varieties of tea available, depending on the oxidation and fermentation techniques applied. Some of the best known are white tea, black tea, red tea and green tea.

Although three quarters of the tea grown in the main tea-producing countries is consumed domestically, tea is a widely traded and exported product.

 

Global consumption trends

Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@kimdonkey?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Manki Kim</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/s/photos/tea?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a>

Photo by Manki Kim on Unsplash

 The global tea industry has been growing rapidly over the last 10 years with an increasing number of consumers worldwide, as revealed in the FAO report: “Emerging Trends in Tea Consumption: Informing a generic promotion process”, published in April 2018. And despite this increase, per capita consumption is still low, so there is still ample room for growth.

According to this report, there are five clear trends in current tea consumption:  

  • Innovation and new health-driven consumption trends. This trend includes new added values being attributed to the product such as ready-to-drink (RTD) fruit and flavoured teas, and increased green tea consumption outside Asia. This RTD trend is being driven by the search for an alternative to carbonated beverages.
  • The move from a commodity to premium value. This trend shows how the tea market has shifted from being seen as a commodity, to the current situation where consumers are now willing to pay more money for premium features.
  • Young consumers’ search for a personal experience with a trendy product. This includes experiences in exclusive hotels and restaurants in different countries.
  • Rising per capita incomes and an emerging middle class are driving tea consumption. A growing middle class, especially in the urban environments of these countries, is driving the growth in demand for tea and the willingness of these consumers to pay more for premium varieties.
  • The urgent call for sustainability, supported by a transparent industry and value chain. Modern tea consumers are attracted to tea, seeing it as a healthy and well-balanced beverage. They are also willing to pay more for it because it has attributes that contribute to the environmental, ethical, social and economic growth of the communities that produce it.

 

Tea and climate change

However, tea production is very sensitive to changes in weather conditions. It can only be produced in specific agro-ecological conditions and in a very limited number of countries that have monsoon climates. This means that climate change has a direct impact on crops.

Changes in temperature, rainfall, floods and droughts are already affecting tea yields and productivity, as explained in the foreword to the documentReport of the working Group on Climate Change of the FAO Intergovernmental Group on Tea”.

Prompted by these concerns and by the dependence of producing and exporting countries on this crop for their national economies, the FAO Intergovernmental Group on Tea (IGG/Tea) resolved to undertake the following:

  • Analysis of the impact of climate change on the tea sub-sector.
  • Appraisal of appropriate technologies and mitigation and adaptation processes to counter this situation.

The findings of this working group have revealed that the decline in tea productivity and yields is due to biotic and abiotic stress, which are directly related to climate.

The application of technology and innovation in agriculture, through the use of biostimulants, increases tolerance to abiotic stress. Biostimulants in agriculture encourage plant nutrition and growth processes irrespective of the nutritional content of the product. They aim to improve one or more of these plant or rhizosphere characteristics, such as nutrient use efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance, quality traits and the availability of nutrients contained in the soil or rhizosphere.

In addition, biostimulation has been shown to effectively reduce the impact of abiotic stress on crops when applied correctly, thereby maximising crop potential and productivity.

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Get the most from biostimulants with these application tips  https://tradecorp.com.es/en/get-the-most-from-biostimulants-with-these-application-tips/ Wed, 19 May 2021 15:04:19 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7658 The crop effect of biostimulants can be further optimised by following these application tips. Most importantly timing is key when applying biostimulants as they activate certain genes in plants that help the crop naturally overcome abiotic stress.   Therefore, knowing the mode of action of each biostimulant will better enable growers to make the best decision about what biostimulant to choose, when to apply it and the recommended dose for the best results.    Biostimulant application tip 1: Prevent the effects of abiotic stress with Primactive effect  […]

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The crop effect of biostimulants can be further optimised by following these application tips. Most importantly timing is key when applying biostimulants as they activate certain genes in plants that help the crop naturally overcome abiotic stress.

 

Therefore, knowing the mode of action of each biostimulant will better enable growers to make the best decision about what biostimulant to choose, when to apply it and the recommended dose for the best results. 

 

Biostimulant application tip 1: Prevent the effects of abiotic stress with Primactive effect 

Some biostimulants prepare or prime the response of the crop to enable it to better resist abiotic stress before the actual stress occurs. These biostimulants generate a cascade of signals that “put the crop on alert and prime the plant. 

When a passing or temporary stress occurs, for example some hot, cold or cloudy days, the alert previously generated by the preventive biostimulant application allows the crop to respond more quickly and effectively to the abiotic stress event. This alerting mechanism allows the crop to maintain or minimise disruption to productive growthmetabolism and eventually yield. 

One type of preventive alert effect is the unique Primactive effect of Tradecorp’s Phylgreen range of products that are based on Ascophyllum nodosum seaweed extract. Preventive biostimulation, such as those with Primactive effect, can help during mild stresses or the early stages of more severe abiotic stress events. Preventive Biostimulants can be viewed as the growers first line defence option that allow crops to minimise or delay the disruption to normal growth. It has been demonstrated that applying a Primactive product as little as one day before stress onset is effective, although application 4 – 7 days before is preferred.

 

Biostimulant application tip 2: Recover from the effects of abiotic stress with Curactive effect 

During more severe or prolonged abiotic stress situations, such as a long heatwave or cold spell, the crops demand for resources will alter away from yield and quality production to focus on more essential basic growth and survival functions. This consequently reduces final harvest potential. 

In these situations, the application of corrective, post-stress or recovery Biostimulants will benefit the crop, and also the grower’s profitability. Recovery Biostimulants help the crop to return to normal growth as quickly and efficiently as possible, thus recovering some, but not all of the potentially lost yield and quality. In these recovery situations Curactive solutions such as Tradecorp’s Amino Acid range are the go-to Biostimulants of choice. 

Our Amino Acid range is the ideal solution for plants that need to recover from the negative effects of Abiotic Stress Nature consists of the basic elements, such as Oxygen, Hydrogen and Carbon, that combine to make all matter that is present in the world. A similar principle operates in living organisms, such as plants, which are composed of the “elements of life”, the twenty or so foundation or elemental Amino Acids. 

These foundation Amino Acids are essential for growth, yield and quality. In addition, they are also the key to help crops recover quickly from abiotic stress and resume their normal growth trajectory. Application of Curactive Biostimulants such as Amino Acids either during (like the graphic above) or to recover after a stress event is thus in perfect harmony with the natural growth and internal stress management cycle of crops. 

 

Where is knowledge at today regarding Biostimulants? Where are we heading? 

As knowledge about Biostimulants and their preventive and recovery modes of action has improved, today it is clear that, similar to pest and pathogen management strategies, a combined abiotic stress management program that integrates both a preventive, and recovery strategies gives the optimum result in terms of yield and quality.  

However, knowledge about the mode of action of Biostimulants continues to improve. The next generation of biostimulants, that are already in development, will move beyond generalised preventive and recovery strategies. It will become the norm to see Biostimulants that target specific abiotic stresses, such as drought or salinity, or that target specific crop growth stages, such as improving fruit set or that enhance fruit swell and development. Many of these new Biostimulants will also incorporate other novel aspects, such as ultra-low dosages and ultra-efficiency.  

The biostimulation industry is innovative and dynamic. Thanks to Biostimulants, and the increased knowledge about them, growers are prepared today to better understand and manage abiotic stressCurrent and future innovation in the biostimulation industry will certainly bring even more tools to growers and these will help them to continue feeding the world, providing safe, sufficient and nutritious food.

 


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Tradecorp, gold sponsor of Farm to Fork Europe  https://tradecorp.com.es/en/tradecorp-gold-sponsor-of-farm-to-fork-europe/ Wed, 19 May 2021 09:29:02 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7644 Tradecorp is a gold sponsor of the Farm to Fork Europe conference entitled “Emerging opportunities and trends in european agri-food & the role of biostimulants in the next-gen food chain.”   This event, organised by the European Biostimulants Industry Council (EBIC) and New Ag International, aims to promote a more sustainable food chain. Farm to Fork Europe seeks to create a virtual platform for all the agents in the industry, where they can participate and interact to shape European […]

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Tradecorp is a gold sponsor of the Farm to Fork Europe conference entitled Emerging opportunities and trends in european agri-food & the role of biostimulants in the next-gen food chain.”  

This event, organised by the European Biostimulants Industry Council (EBIC) and New Ag International, aims to promote a more sustainable food chain. Farm to Fork Europe seeks to create a virtual platform for all the agents in the industry, where they can participate and interact to shape European agri-food so that is aligned with consumer demand as well as enabling businesses to deliver and regulatory institutions to approve. It also aims to create a space for exchanging knowledge, sharing experiences and generating new ideas. 

This virtual event is scheduled to take place from 22-24 June and is set to bring together key companies, institutions and representatives from the agri-food industry.   

Leveraging the power of investment 

Leading industry experts will be sharing their knowledge via a series of presentations and digital meetings. These figures include representatives from the EBIC, the FAO and the European Commission, among other organisations 

José Alfredo García, the Bionutrition COO at Tradecorp, will be giving a speech entitled “The long game for investees: leveraging the power of investment in your company over time”, in which he will explain how to create value for the different stakeholders in the value chain. The talk is scheduled for 22 June at 11.45 am.    

“The long game for investees: 
leveraging the power of investment in your company over time”
by José Alfredo García

 22 June 
11.45 am 

For attendees interested in learning more about Tradecorp and how our company can help in meeting the Farm to Fork challenges, we have scheduled a live chat room where our team will be available to assist visitors.

 

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Rovensa careers website is now available https://tradecorp.com.es/en/rovensa-careers-website-is-now-available/ Tue, 18 May 2021 08:03:26 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7637 Rovensa is launching today a new Careers Website, in which candidates can find job and internship opportunities across the world. Available at careers.rovensa.com, you can know more About us, What we do, and What we look for in our People, not forgetting what drives us – our SEEDS values: Safety, Empowerment, Ethics, Dedication, and Striving. Candidates will be able to create a profile and join our talent pool, keeping them informed about new […]

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Rovensa is launching today a new Careers Website, in which candidates can find job and internship opportunities across the world.

Available at careers.rovensa.com, you can know more About us, What we do, and What we look for in our People, not forgetting what drives us – our SEEDS values: Safety, Empowerment, Ethics, Dedication, and Striving.

Candidates will be able to create a profile and join our talent pool, keeping them informed about new job opportunities that match their profile. This website is fully responsive to mobile and other devices and has a user-friendly interface to provide a positive experience.

Register now on our career’s website to join our talent pool and be part of our purposeful mission of feeding the planet!

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Tradecorp reduces its CO2 emissions by 240,399 kg thanks to packaging recycling in Spain https://tradecorp.com.es/en/tradecorp-reduces-its-co2-emissions-by-240399-kg-thanks-to-packaging-recycling-in-spain/ Thu, 13 May 2021 13:55:25 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7621 Tradecorp has received public recognition for its work in the field of sustainability and environmental protection as a result of recycling its packaging in Spain. Specifically, Tradecorp reduced its CO2 emissions by 240,399 kg in 2020.    “This recognition is particularly exciting for us as it demonstrates Tradecorp’s firm commitment to the development of sustainable, viable agriculture that looks after the […]

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Tradecorp has received public recognition for its work in the field of sustainability and environmental protection as a result of recycling its packaging in Spain. Specifically, Tradecorp reduced its CO2 emissions by 240,399 kg in 2020. 

 

“This recognition is particularly exciting for us as it demonstrates Tradecorp’s firm commitment to the development of sustainable, viable agriculture that looks after the planet. We are not only aware of this task, but we also want to play a leading role in it and work alongside all the farming industry employees who dedicate their lives to protecting the environment”, said Tradecorp in a company statement. 

 

The diploma was awarded by Sigfito, an NGO created to set up a system that collects agricultural packaging in order to give it the correct environmental treatment. The organisation is grateful for the work carried out by Tradecorp in “helping to save the planet every day and making it a more sustainable place.”  

 

The accolade is a reflection of Tradecorp’s efforts and commitment to the sustainability of the primary sector and its engagement with the environment to promote the development of the circular economy, which is a key strategy in the fight against climate change, global warming, the preservation of biodiversity and the sustainability of agriculture. 

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Tradecorp and Landlab present Biotool, a platform to assess the impact of biostimulants on efficient water management  https://tradecorp.com.es/en/tradecorp-and-landlab-present-biotool-a-platform-to-assess-the-impact-of-biostimulants-on-efficient-water-management/ Thu, 06 May 2021 08:22:54 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7600 Tradecorp and Landlab have presented the Biotool Platform project to the Eurostars initiative. This innovative tool aims to measure the effect of biostimulants on plants and improve crop yields through efficient water use.   Water resources are of mounting concern in the farming industry given the increasing trend towards growing crops in semi-arid regions and the irrigation requirements this involves. It is estimated that 70% of available water is used in agriculture. A […]

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Tradecorp and Landlab have presented the Biotool Platform project to the Eurostars initiative. This innovative tool aims to measure the effect of biostimulants on plants and improve crop yields through efficient water use. 

 Water resources are of mounting concern in the farming industry given the increasing trend towards growing crops in semi-arid regions and the irrigation requirements this involves. It is estimated that 70% of available water is used in agriculture. A potential solution to tackle this challenge is to improve crop yields by enhancing water use efficiency (WUE). 

 Given the planet’s limited water resources, the industry is focusing on the development of new technologies and the use of new products, such as biostimulants, to help growers maximise water efficiency. In this context, tools such as the Biotool Platform can encourage the production of new biostimulants that are increasingly efficient not only in terms of crop yields, but also in terms of plant water management. 

The Biotool Platform will improve understanding of how water is used in greenhouse crops and how to optimise the way it is managed through biostimulants. In other words, the grower can increase production quality, boost yields and reduce economic losses caused by different types of abiotic stresses, based on water stress as a model.    

 

The Biotool Platform, a joint venture between Tradecorp and Landlab 

The project, developed by Tradecorp and Landlab, combines the know-how and experience of both organisations.   

Tradecorp provides its experience in the development and production of biostimulants, as well as its production expertise and market knowledge. It will be in charge of testing and validating the new biostimulants on different types of crops, soil and weather conditions. 

 Landlab is a research centre specialising in the assessment, cultivation and development of prototypes, products, techniques and strategies for nutrition, biostimulation and plant protection.  

The relationship between Landlab and Tradecorp dates back to 2015 when they started working together to develop new biostimulants and product positioning, among other projects.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

The Eurostars programme, a European Union initiative   

 The Biotool project has been presented to the European Union’s Eurostars programme which supports SMEs in R&D projects, as is the case of LandlabEurostars funds transnational projects started and led by SMEs, involving at least two partners from different participating countries, and lasting no more than three years. 

The ultimate goal of the project is to transfer knowledge to the market. Therefore, within two years of the completion of the research period, the product must be ready for market launch. 

 

Water scarcity: the challenge of the 21st century 

This tool responds to the water challenge facing farming in the 21st century. Agriculture consumes an average 70% of freshwater withdrawals from the world’s water resources.   

According to the World Bank, irrigated agriculture represents 20% of the total cultivated land and contributes 40% of total food production worldwideThis organisation goes on to say that competition for water resources is expected to increase, which will put more pressure on farming. 

Factors such as population growth, urban development, industrialisation and climate change all affect water consumption, making it necessary to improve the efficiency of water use. According to the FAO, the annual amount of available freshwater resources per person has shrunk by more than 20% in the past two decades. In areas such as North Africa and West Asia, the decline in freshwater per capita has exceeded 30%. 

 

Rising population and dwindling water resources 

As water resources decline, the world’s population is expected to reach 10 billion by 2050 and all these people will need food. This is compounded by growing demand from a part of the planet for more food, more varied foodstuffs and more water to produce them, among other things. And all this puts additional pressure on agricultural production.  

According to World Bank studies, irrigated crops are, on average, twice as productive as rainfed crops. However, the combination of population growth, increased food production and reduced water resources requires tighter water consumption, especially in farming. The scarcity of water resources is an ongoing problem. According to the latest FAO report, which analyses the state of food in 2020, 3.2 billion people live in agricultural areas with high to very high water scarcity. And of these, 1.2 billion suffer from severe water constraints. 

 

Biostimulants and water shortages 

In previous studies, Tradecorp reached the conclusion that biostimulants can help plants to overcome moments of water stress when applied in a preventive way, i.e. a Primactive effect. Against this background, reduced water use and the joint application of new Tradecorp biostimulants, developed in the BIOTOOL project, can improve yields with less water. 

 

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Biostimulation, from novel technology to a must in agriculture https://tradecorp.com.es/en/biostimulation-from-novel-technology-to-a-must-in-agriculture/ Tue, 27 Apr 2021 10:48:09 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7552 In recent years climate change has gone from being a probability to becoming a reality that determines, for better or worse, our daily lives. As a consequence, climate change and climate breakdown have become a priority problem that is influencing agricultural production worldwide, for example by affecting rainfall patterns, temperature, and even seasonal patterns.   […]

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In recent years climate change has gone from being a probability to becoming a reality that determines, for better or worse, our daily lives.

As a consequence, climate change and climate breakdown have become a priority problem that is influencing agricultural production worldwide, for example by affecting rainfall patterns, temperature, and even seasonal patterns.

 

Traditionally farmers and growers considered variables such as the time of year, seeds, fertilisers, plant protection and soil management, among others. However, in recent years “new” challenges have emerged, particularly linked to climate change. These newer challenges mean that to achieve a crops’ full potential, traditional plant nutrition and plant protection practices are no longer sufficient.

These external, non-pathogenic and non-biological challenges are known collectively as non-living stresses or abiotic stress. Today management of these abiotic stresses is one of the principal topics of discussion, and research, in agriculture. It is widely accepted that if abiotic stress could be well managed there is the potential to go a long way towards increasing global food production by the 50% needed by 2050, and achieving this necessity in a more sustainable fashion. However, this will be no easy challenge…

 

Abiotic stress management with biostimulants

One of the most promising areas of research in abiotic stress management is biostimulation of plants. When applied appropriately, biostimulants have been demonstrated to effectively reduce the impact of abiotic stress on crops, helping them to achieve their full yield and quality potential.

In recent years, the use of biostimulants has been recognised as a good agricultural practice, assisting agriculture to become more sustainable and even more environmentally friendly. In fact biostimulants have such potential in abiotic stress management in agriculture that this “new” industry has grown rapidly from an insignificant size ten years ago, to today where it is estimated to be worth around $2.3 billion (2020) and to reach more than $4 billion in 2023. The rapid and continued growth of this market is farmer driven as they have been quick to recognise the benefits these products bring to their crop… and their bottom line.

A plant “biostimulant” in agriculture, according to the definition in the European Union fertiliser regulations, is a product that stimulates plant nutrition and growth processes independently of the product’s nutritional content. Biostimulants have the sole aim of improving one or more of the following characteristics of the plant, or the plant rhizosphere (root zone):

  • nutrient use efficiency
  • tolerance to abiotic stress
  • quality traits
  • availability of confined nutrients in soil or rhizosphere

While biostimulation has been demonstrated to effectively reduce the impact of abiotic stress on crops, an important point about them is that they have no specific effect on pathogens or pests. Thus, to control these biotic challenges, plant protection products will still be needed.

 

How do biostimulants work?

Biostimulants have the capability to trigger and improve the ability of crops to naturally resist abiotic stress effects. In essence, with or without biostimulants, the crop will alter its metabolism to respond to an abiotic stress. However, the use of biostimulants on crops allows for a quicker, more effective and /or more efficient response by the crop.

There are a variety of sources that may have biostimulant properties, and they differ in their origin and / or their modes of action within the plant. In general, biostimulants can be allocated to one of seven groups: humic / fulvic acids, protein hydrolysates (e.g. amino acids), seaweed extracts, chitosan, inorganic compounds, beneficial fungi and beneficial bacteria (du Jardin 2015). These diverse sources are still being fully explored and understood, and are yielding a steady stream of new innovations and products for agriculture.

Increasing knowledge about the mode of action of each biostimulant is now enabling growers to make the best decision about which biostimulant to choose, when to apply it and what dosage to use. By understanding the mode of action, growers can now know what beneficial effect is expected from that particular biostimulant application (Brown & Saa 2015). All of this new information is benefiting the grower’s decision making.

 

What are the best options to prevent and mitigate abiotic stress?

When dealing with abiotic stress, choosing the most appropriate product, the right application time, and the best method of application is not always an easy task. For optimal results, product knowhow, and its correct inclusion in agronomic strategies are key to ensuring that the maximum effect and return on investment are achieved. In a new sector such as biostimulants, this is a lot of new knowledge to assimilate.

Tradecorp have been focusing on presenting, and making available in other formats, these recent advances in agronomic knowledge to growers as easy to understand concepts, and information, to empower them to make best use of this rapidly evolving technology in their agronomic programs.

 

Humics: Humistar/Humifirst range

 

Humifirst-WGHumic acids provide a complete improvement of soil fertility via a positive effect on the physical characteristics (structure), chemical characteristics (greater availability and recycling of nutrients), and biological characteristics (increased microbial life) of soil by;

  • Enhancing root elongation and secondary root development
  • Integral improvement of chemical and physical soil conditions
  • Increasing soil microbial populations
  • Increasing fertiliser use efficiency

 

+ Other factors to consider in decision making regarding humic acids include;

– Balance between longer lasting humic acids, and quick acting fulvic acids
– Use of recognised and well-studied raw materials such as American Leonardite
– Products approved for Organic Agriculture by OMRI are available

 

+For more detailed information on humic acids to help in decision making see the following articles:

 

Amino acids: Vegenergy, Delfan and Aton ranges 

 

Tradecorp’s range of amino acids is based on free L-α amino acids, which are key to recover crops during or after an intense stress period. Factors to consider about amino acids include;

 

+ More information about amino acids:

 

 

Seaweeds: Phylgreen range

 

Seaweed biostimulants come in many different shapes and forms. Tradecorp´s Phylgreen range is specifically designed to prevent abiotic stress in crop by applying the product before the onset of abiotic stress.

 

 

Botanical extracts: Vegecore range

 

Natural solutions to promote root and plant growth derived from plant origin.

  • Obtained from renewable and sustainably grown plants
  • High in fulvic acids, which strongly promote root and plant growth
  • Recommended for root application, also suitable for foliar supply
  • Slightly acid pH for high compatibility with other agricultural products
  • Increases beneficial soil microbial activity

 

+ Take a look at our range of biostimulants and humic acids

+ Looking for biostimulants that are suitable for Organic Agriculture? Check here.

+ Would you like to know the available biostimulants in your market? Select country,get in touch with your local Tradecorp team or send us an e-mail to global@tradecorp.rovensa.com

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Organic agriculture hits new record high with 72.3 million hectares worldwide https://tradecorp.com.es/en/organic-agriculture-hits-new-record-high-with-72-3-million-hectares-worldwide/ Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:48:35 +0000 https://tradecorp.com.es/en/?p=7534 The amount of organic land and sales of organic produce continue to climb and have hit a new record high, according to the report “The world of organic agriculture. Statistics & emerging trends 2021”,  published by the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) and IFOAM – Organics International.   In 2019, there were 72.3 million hectares under organic farming, 1.6% more than in […]

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The amount of organic land and sales of organic produce continue to climb and have hit a new record high, according to the report “The world of organic agriculture. Statistics & emerging trends 2021”,  published by the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBLand IFOAM – Organics International.  

In 2019, there were 72.3 million hectares under organic farming, 1.6% more than in 2018. The regions with the most organic land were Oceania with 35.9 million hectares, representing half of the total, and Europe with 16.5 million hectares, 23% of the total.

They were followed by Latin America with 8.3 million hectares (11%), Asia with 5.9 million hectares (8%), North America with 3.6 million hectares (5%), and Africa with 2 million hectares (3%).

Organic agriculture is growing, and India and Kazakhstan are investing heavily in it

In 2019, the amount of organically farmed land increased by 1.1 million hectares, up 1.6%. This growth reflects a general increase in all regions, especially Europe, which increased the amount of organic land by +0.9 million hectares (+5.9%) and North America which added 0.3 million hectares to its organic total (+9.1%).

Conversely, Asia saw a decrease in the number of hectares under organic cultivation (-7.1%), mainly affected by decreases in China and Oceania (-0.3%).

If we take a closer look by countries, many of them reported a significant rise in the number of hectares under organic farming. This was particularly significant in India and Kazakhstan, which saw increases of 0.36 million hectares and 0.1 million hectares, respectively, i.e. +18.6%.

 

Main organic crops

In the case of arable crops, cereals accounted for the largest area under organic farming (5.07 million ha), followed by pasture (3.2 million ha) and oilseeds (1.7 million ha). Organic cereals and oilseeds grew dramatically in 2019, registering increases of +309,738 ha and +182,561 ha, respectively, contrasting with a drop in the number of hectares for pasture.

In the case of permanent crops, olive groves (0.9 million ha), coffee plantations (0.7 million ha) and nut crops (0.6 million ha) accounted for the largest number of hectares used for organic farming. Although there was good growth in olive groves (+22,566 ha), the increases in temperate climate fruit (+72,218 ha), grapes (+45,012 ha) and cocoa (+42,223 ha) were especially strong.

 

A global market of over €106 billion

According to FiBL data, the consumption of organic agricultural produce exceeded €106 billion in 2019. The main organic markets were the United States (€44.7 billion), followed by the European Union (€41.4 billion) and China (€8.5 billion).

The market grew in 2019 in all countries in which data was available, with double-digit increases in some cases. Organic consumption in France recorded the strongest growth with demand going up by 13.4%.

Europe recorded the highest per capita consumption of organic products, with Denmark leading the way (€344), followed by Switzerland (€338), Luxembourg (€265) and Austria (€216).

 

Organic agriculture, a thriving market that drives R&D

In line with growing consumer demand for organic produce, the number of organic farmers and hectares is increasing. What was once a niche market has become mainstream and this is driving R&D to develop solutions that encourage environmentally friendly production without compromising productivity and crop quality.

In a recent interview with Agropages, Cathal Daynes, Tradecorp’s Global Technical Manager, explained the company’s approach to organic farming: “Tradecorp’s philosophy is that growers who follow organic and sustainable farming programmes must have access to premium quality, highly efficient products.”

Accordingly, Tradecorp offers a broad portfolio with over 50 organic agriculture solutions, approved under different standards, such as EU, NOP and JAS, and recognised by reputable international certification bodies, such as Ecocert, OMRI and FIBL, as well as national agencies.

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